Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Who has experience with coffee and chocolate?
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Old 04-15-2014, 05:33 PM   #11
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I made a coffee pumpkin stout a few years back. I used coffee beans in secondary. I racked the beer right on top of the beans. I think I used 1lb and left it on there for 7 days. The coffee flavor was there, but probably could have used more.

I just brewed a chocolate stout recently and put six ounces of unsweetened bakers chocolate in for the last 10 minutes of the boil. That's still in primary though, so I'm not sure how that will turn out.

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Old 04-15-2014, 07:22 PM   #12
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I used 8 oz of Hershey's unsweetened cocoa powder @10 min for Jamil's chocolate hazelnut porter and it was pretty great. Definite chocolate flavor. I didn't strain it out (if that would even be possible). It all went into the fermenter. My understanding is that the longer it sits on the chocolate the more flavor you get out of it and I believe it. I let it sit in primary for 30 days. Probably won't do that next time, as it may have been a little too long - very chocolatey

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Old 04-15-2014, 07:32 PM   #13
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I have not yet used coffee in a beer, but if I did I would brew the coffee cold. Put the grounds and water into a french press (or anything that you can attach a filter to easily), and let it sit in the fridge overnight. Cold brewing the coffee allows you to extract the coffee flavor without any of the bitterness.

As for the chocolate, I met with a local professional brewer and asked what the best method would be. He told me to make a extract, which blew me away because I never saw that suggestion in all my online reading. It makes tons of sense for a lot of obvious reasons, and it avoids all the mess and filtering involved with using real chocolate or dumping powder in there.

Chocolate extract recipe:
1 part cocoa powder, preferably Dutch process. Not Hershey's or Nesquik.
2 parts 70-80 proof vodka.
Combine in a saucepan, and heat to about 170* or so for a few minutes (heating destroys some of the flavor, but without it the extract can take 10 months to really come together), then pour into a jar (I actually used a capped beer bottle) and let it sit in a dark place for at least 2-3 weeks, shaking it every day.

And that's it! I used about 3/4 c. of powder, and 1 and 1/2 c. of vodka, and it worked great for a 5 gallon batch.
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Old 04-15-2014, 07:40 PM   #14
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[QUOTE=MrCrabby;6063656]Cold brewing the coffee allows you to extract the coffee flavor without any of the bitterness.QUOTE]

This, as far as the coffee goes. I've tried brewing coffee and cold brewing. My best experience thus far:

Cold brew 96oz of coffee (make sure you get a decent coffee...I wouldn't suggest something like Folgers or Maxwell House). When you're ready to bottle, mix the coffee with your priming sugar, mix that into your bottling bucket, and bottle/keg.

Worked wonderfully for me. It was a good coffee flavor, but not completely overpowering. Additionally, the bitterness was not extracted since the coffee was never heated. Good stuff.
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Old 04-15-2014, 07:45 PM   #15
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I have made both a double chocolate stout and a coffee bourbon stout, but I have not combined the two. I cold brewed the coffee, which I strongly recommend. Cold brewed coffee has less bitterness and less acidity, so you get more flavor. I used about 20 oz of water and about 4 oz of coffee and the flavor is certainly pronounced in the beer. For the chocolate beer, I used Godiva chocolate powder in secondary and it turned out very well.
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Old 04-17-2014, 02:04 PM   #16
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Well I can tell you what NOT to do. I added 0.75lb of Sumatra to the secondary fermenter before doing any research on this. That is WAY too much for a 5gal batch. I also think 2 weeks in the secondary was too long. The coffee overpowered the brew and came out syrupy. Next time I'm going to use the cold brew methods mentioned here
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Old 04-17-2014, 04:47 PM   #17
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With my last chocolate coffee stout, I cold pressed 2 oz of coffee in a 1.5 cups water and used 4 oz cacao nibs. I added both after the primary fermentation. I left the nibs in for about 30 days.

At first the chocolate aroma was a little strong and the coffee flavor was not strong enough. Over time the chocolate mellowed out and the coffee became more prominent. It's 6 months old now and I still have some. I would say the flavor is exactly where I want it. Makes me wish I had saved more!
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:28 PM   #18
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thank you all for the awesome replies. I have a lot to consider and I'm excited to get this batch off the ground ill post the results as soon as I get them. in the meantime keep the advice coming! great website!
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Old 04-17-2014, 08:10 PM   #19
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Holy carp, some of you use a lot of coffee! I think I added 1 oz of coarsely ground Caribou beans in my hop mesh bag. Added to secondary for 24 hrs and I could taste it even in a 1.102 OG RIS. Could have gone 2 oz perhaps, but I wanted it in the background.

As far as chocolate goes, many routes to take. You can get chocolate notes from straight up chocolate malt. As little as 6oz, as much as 16 oz (adds a lot of roast at 16 oz also).

Option 2, is unsweetened cocoa powder. I added 6 oz of powder at flameout. Gave a lot of nice chocoloate flavor, but it aged in the keg 3 months before I tapped it. It was pretty bitter and astringent before then.

Nibs soaked in vodka for a couple of weeks (all added into secondary) will be my next try in a chocolate porter. Probably start with 4 oz of nibs and see how that works.
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Old 04-19-2014, 12:09 PM   #20
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I've done chocolate stout and coffee porter, but haven't combined the two.......yet.

The stout turns out with a nice chocolate flavor by simply adding 8oz of unsweetened cocoa powder and a pound of lactose (to balance out the bitterness of the cocoa) mixed dry in a bowl then made into a pourable slurry by adding some warm water. Add the slurry to the boil at 10 min.

Cold brewing the coffee is the way to go IMO. Get 4oz of dark roast beans, course grind and let them sit about 12 hours in cold water on the kitchen counter. Strain out the grounds and add at bottling/kegging time.

FYI- a beer with this sort of complexity is going to need some extra conditioning time to get right. Wait 3 months before trying it out and your patience will be rewarded.

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