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Old 04-07-2014, 05:48 PM   #1
Clarke
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Default Brewing for Color

Any advise on taking a single grain such as Maris Otter, boiling it down to achieve a darker more caramelized color and flavor?


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Old 04-07-2014, 06:17 PM   #2
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I think that was a common practice used to produce Scottish ales.


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Old 04-07-2014, 08:26 PM   #3
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Yes, its called the maillard reaction. The longer you boil, the darker the wort will be and more complex flavors you will get.
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Old 04-10-2014, 05:26 PM   #4
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been meaning to get back to this thread and say thanks for the "maillard reaction", I have been reading up on this, knowing the name really helped out.

Thanks
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Old 04-16-2014, 05:36 AM   #5
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Remember that Maillard reactions and caramelization are two different things chemically. They also can produce different flavors with different temps and times (caramelization needing way higher temps). Keep this in mind when hoping or planning for certain qualities in your brew!


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Old 04-20-2014, 06:50 AM   #6
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It totally depends on what you want to do. It is true that boiling deepens the color of your beer through the Maillards Reaction but this reaction creates melanoidins (biscuit flavor)...so keep that in mind when you formulate your recipe. The technique is often used, in fact BJCP states that dark malts should be used with restraint in barleywines and color should come from long boils.


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Old 04-21-2014, 02:42 AM   #7
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You could also roast the grain, or at least a portion of it.
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Old 04-21-2014, 05:27 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclman View Post
You could also roast the grain, or at least a portion of it.
When you say "roast" - I have been thinking about oven toasting my grain, I have 2 pounds set aside to do such a thing just haven't done it yet...

Are we talking about the same thing?
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Old 04-21-2014, 07:05 PM   #9
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The easiest way to create a deeper color and melanoidin flavors from MO is to take a portion of the first runnings (higher gravity runnings) and reduce that in a high boil while boiling the rest of your wort. I usually reduce mine to about 1/4 of original volume and add it back into the rest of the wort boil at flame out for my scottish ales.
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Old 04-21-2014, 07:13 PM   #10
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I just add some melanoidin malt to my grain bill......and I do 90 minute boils at least when trying to get that kind of flavor/color.


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