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Old 12-03-2007, 07:16 PM   #1
neo82087
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Oct 2007
Chicago
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I'm trying to figure out how to wire up a 220v 4500 watt heating element to a PID. The diagram that I'm thinking of following is located here

My concern is that 110v will be running directly to the heating element. I don't know if that would cause a problem or not. Anyone with some electrical ability have any input?

Thanks

 
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Old 12-03-2007, 07:31 PM   #2
wihophead
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Jul 2007
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It wouldn't cause a problem per say but it would be wise choice to either use an additional SSR for the other hot leg or substitute the 2 SSR's for 1 SSRD.


 
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Old 12-03-2007, 10:13 PM   #3
neo82087
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Oct 2007
Chicago
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How does this look?



My only question now is how to I ensure that the circuit is grounded? What do I ground the connection to on the side of the heating element?

Thanks.

 
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Old 12-04-2007, 02:01 AM   #4
drez77
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Jan 2007
Palmer MA
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To ground the element you have to create a place to attach the ground wire. On my HLT I soldered a piece of copper to attach the ground wire to. Here is another example. http://essersnet.com/php/content.php?viewPage&ID=200 . If you are using a keggle you can attach the ground to the skirt of the keg with a bolt.

mike

 
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Old 12-04-2007, 02:35 AM   #5
stevehaun
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Dec 2006
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Several suggestions:
1. Place a 30 amp, double pole switch between the terminal strip and the SSRs. In this manner, you will be able to turn the element off with the flick of a switch. Also, with this switch, two SSRs are not necessary - one will be sufficient.
2. Is your PID rated for 240 VAC? That is how you have it wired.
3. You should move the inline GFI to the powercord end of your system.
4. Ground everything. The kettle, the double pole switch, and the enclosure should all be grounded.
5. You may want to add a switch to your PID.
Lastly, have an electrician or electrical engineer review the project before you plug it in.
Have fun!

 
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Old 12-04-2007, 02:37 AM   #6
stevehaun
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One more thing - you really need a 30 amp GFI.

 
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Old 12-04-2007, 03:22 AM   #7
neo82087
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Oct 2007
Chicago
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Do you happen to know where I could find a 30 amp GFI? I have had trouble finding GFIs rated for 240v. The PID I have has a power supply voltage rating of 85~264VAC/50~60Hz.

 
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Old 12-04-2007, 01:12 PM   #8
wihophead
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You would have to use a 4 wire system so you could get 120 volts for your temperature controller unless it is rated for 220V but I doubt it is. Doing this will also make it impossible to put the GFCI on the cords line side since the load will not be balanced. If the load is not balanced the GFCI will trip.

We use 20A 220V GFCI's here let me get the info off of it and see if they make a 30A.
Another option is to use a 30A 2 pole GFCI breaker but then you would have to use a transformer or separately power your temperature controller since the load will not be balanced as stated earlier.


I just noticed that the SSR triggers are wired directly to the output of the temperature controller. I know nothing about the specs of the unit you are using but the Watlow units we use are either relay or ssr type so if this is the case you would also need a DC supply if they use a DC input or you would need to grab 120V if they use an AC input.

Posting model numbers would really help.....


Edit:
The only high power GFCI's that I found by the manufacturer that we use are designed to protect equipment and not persons...sorry


 
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Old 12-04-2007, 03:40 PM   #9
neo82087
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Oct 2007
Chicago
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http://auberins.com/index.php?main_p...bcfa095f3c2741

Would it instead be possible to wire up two 110v 1500 watt elements? How would I do this instead? Thanks for all of the help.

 
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Old 12-04-2007, 03:55 PM   #10
wihophead
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It appears that the controller you picked has a 12VDC output so it will work as you intended.

You could parallel two 1500W 120V heaters very easily and you still will be looking at a 30A circuit. Will that setup give you enough heating power???

 
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