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Old 03-12-2014, 01:05 PM   #1
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Default Weber Kettle Thread!

I got a 22.5 Weber Kettle charcoal grill a while back, and I'm just starting to learn the subtleties and all the tricks to really do some good grilling. I used to just fire up a whole chimney (or God forbid, build a pyramid and light it with lighter fluid) and have at it, but I've recently gotten to learn all about direct vs. indirect grilling, temperature and airflow control, and some other tips, so I thought I'd share and give a place for others to share too. (But at the same time, I don't really want to restart the gas vs. charcoal, lump vs. briquette debates, etc.)

I'll start:

I grill with the top vent wide open and I use the bottom vents to control the temps. That lets me put a cheap oven thermometer right under the top vent, so I can see the temp without opening the lid.

Charcoal rails are awesome - it allows me to set up pretty much any configuration for direct or indirect grilling.

I only need about 1/3 of a chimney for most cooks.

Vegetables (especially sliced beets, carrots, asparagus, and Brussels sprouts) are super, super tasty off the grill.

Steaks and burgers get high direct heat. Most seafood and veggies get medium direct heat. Everything else is indirect.

It's never too cold outside for grilling.

Anyway, that's all for now. Happy grilling, folks and can't wait to hear others' tips and tricks.


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Old 03-12-2014, 01:28 PM   #2
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I've got the same BBQ, it is a great unit.
I'm in Canada so I'm severly challenged when it comes to southern US style smoking techniques, typically we grill on high heat in these parts. My attempts at low and slow BBQ so far have all ended in total disappointment, it's just one those things I can't seem to pick up, so this past winter I've tried to learn this style of cooking and get some much needed education on techniques.

One thing I'm really excited to try this summer is the 'charcoal snake' method, if you search for that there's a few popular videos, looks like a simple and effective way to get a slow and steady burn.

Also looking at the Maverick ET-733 thermometers, they look like a quality unit.

Just a couple of things for those of us people where low and slow BBQ just dosn't come natually.

PS, -40 is too cold for this guy to BBQ


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Old 03-12-2014, 01:39 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cramar View Post
I've got the same BBQ, it is a great unit.
I'm in Canada so I'm severly challenged when it comes to southern US style smoking techniques, typically we grill on high heat in these parts. My attempts at low and slow BBQ so far have all ended in total disappointment, it's just one those things I can't seem to pick up, so this past winter I've tried to learn this style of cooking and get some much needed education on techniques.

One thing I'm really excited to try this summer is the 'charcoal snake' method, if you search for that there's a few popular videos, looks like a simple and effective way to get a slow and steady burn.

Also looking at the Maverick ET-733 thermometers, they look like a quality unit.

Just a couple of things for those of us people where low and slow BBQ just dosn't come natually.

PS, -40 is too cold for this guy to BBQ

The Webber Kettle is really a grill, not a BBQ unit. If you are really interested in doing real BBQ (and serious about it); I think you would be better off with an actual BBQ smoker.

The Kettle grill can be modded for a passable substitute, but that is about it. It just doesn't give you the fine control, in my opinion.

Sometimes it is just best to use the right tool for the job...
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:08 PM   #4
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*sigh*
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Old 03-12-2014, 03:56 PM   #5
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Well, you can always go this route with the Weber:
http://www.amazon.com/SMOKENATOR-100...dp/B000HI3I68/
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Old 03-13-2014, 01:40 AM   #6
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The chimney, Thermapen, and a $5 pair of welding gloves have been the three most invaluable kick-@ss things I have gotten to use with the Weber kettle.

And, as for the chimney, I take a lit can of Sterno and put it under the chimney for 2-3 minutes, and the coals take off. No need for the newspaper and all the burning bits that fly around.
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:22 AM   #7
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A can of sterno! Brilliant! I do love the chimney method. What we do is fill both coal bins and light one bin worth at a time in the chimney. It makes for two evenly lit bins.

For cooking, we put the bins on the circumference of the grate they sit on and put a steel baking pan in-between them. The pan catches drips and keeps the ash clearer from getting gunked up.

We also have the flip up grill to cook on. If we need to add coals or wood or just mess with them, there's hinged places for easy access without lifting the whole thing.

Hard lump > briquettes, because I say so. And a bin does seem to last longer.
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:27 AM   #8
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The Weber Performer is a great grill that makes lighting those coals easy - with gas. I've used the crap out of mine.
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:53 AM   #9
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Default Weber Kettles are Great

Quote:
Originally Posted by cramar View Post
I've got the same BBQ, it is a great unit.
I'm in Canada so I'm severly challenged when it comes to southern US style smoking techniques, typically we grill on high heat in these parts. My attempts at low and slow BBQ so far have all ended in total disappointment, it's just one those things I can't seem to pick up, so this past winter I've tried to learn this style of cooking and get some much needed education on techniques.
Webers are awesome. I grill all year round and on a Weber grill (Kingsford briquettes in a chimney) exclusively for over 35 years. Teriyaki Pork Roasts, Pork Tenderloins, Steaks, Burgers, Sausages, whole turkey and turkey breasts, chicken, and chops are all fantastic.

I plan on getting a Weber Smokey Mountain this summer to do real smoking but I have had good luck with grilling/smoking ribs, beef brisket or pork shoulder on the Weber using direct heat with whatever wood chips you want (mainly hickory in my case) for about 20 minutes (about 10 minutes on each side) until crusted then removing from the grill and double wrapping in heavy duty foil and putting in the oven for 6-12 hours depending on the meat at 225F. (5-6 hrs for the ribs)

I have heard great reviews for the Smokey Mountain.
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Old 03-13-2014, 04:14 AM   #10
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I have both, gas and wood. I love the smoke the charcoal gives. I like watching these guy.


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