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Old 03-16-2014, 03:26 PM   #11
ArcLight
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I dump the hops in a few days before cold crashing and bottling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by showcow View Post
Regarding secondary: does not help clarity
It actually does, but takes longer.
The secondary is not a magical clearing tank. When you rack, you pull
in some trub from the bottom. That's the main advantage of a secondary, to minimize the yeast you pull in from the bottom.

Take the 10 days or whatever you need for your primary, rack to a secondary, and let it sit another 2,3+ weeks.

When you rack out of that you will pull in less yeast from the bottom.
The secondary does mix up the yeast, so will take longer to clear.
But the final result will be clearer.


Cold crashing also helps - big time.

If you don't secondary, you may have to leave some extra beer behind as the siphon head gets close to the trub layer.

The real problem with a secondary is the oxidation risk.
On the other hand if there is minimal headspace, compared to a bucket, you can benefit that way.


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Old 03-18-2014, 09:33 PM   #12
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Put the whole leaf hops loose into the secondary first. Use a sanitized funnel and the end of a long sanitized plastic spoon to get them into the carboy. This is more a precaution than a necessity. Carefully rack the beer from the primary onto the dry hops in the secondary and let sit for 5-7 days. Done.

You can also just dump the whole leaf hops loose into the primary using the same method but you'll have a difficult time getting all the hops to fully integrate with the beer.

A work around to this is to use pellet hops directly in the primary after fermentation has finished or significantly slowed down. They will dissolve and much will drop out to the bottom over time. No need to dirty another carboy.


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Old 03-18-2014, 09:40 PM   #13
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Default Just did this 3 days ago

I sanitized a butter knife and placed it in the hops bag and added the hops. just dropped it in the carboy and it ought to come out pretty easy when I transfer to the keg.
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Old 03-18-2014, 11:00 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcLight View Post
When you rack out of that you will pull in less yeast from the bottom.
The secondary does mix up the yeast, so will take longer to clear.
But the final result will be clearer.


Cold crashing also helps - big time.

If you don't secondary, you may have to leave some extra beer behind as the siphon head gets close to the trub layer.

The real problem with a secondary is the oxidation risk.
On the other hand if there is minimal headspace, compared to a bucket, you can benefit that way.

There are plenty of debate threads on this here, but this is the crux of the argument:

You say leave trub behind in primary, mix all the rest up by transfer, let it settle for 2-3 more weeks makes it more clear. I say, why mix it up? The point is, because secondary is not a magical clearing tank, time is the only factor. Not secondary time. Total time. Leave trub in primary, leave more in secondary later - or rack carefully out of primary after the same amount of time and get clear beer faster. - leaving the same amount of trub as you would have primary+secondary trub.

Again, it's not like the yeast won't drop out in primary because there's too much at the bottom already.

All this to ask: in your opinion, why does beer using secondary end up clearer? Sounds like because you give it more time... Try leaving it in primary for all of those 10 days plus 2-3 weeks and I think you'll be surprised.
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Old 03-18-2014, 11:15 PM   #15
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Wait I get it - basically your point is it gives you two chances to siphon, which means less trub in the package.

While of course that makes sense, secondary also has trub - so I don't think that's necessarily true either. You're trying to avoid the top of the trub with your siphon... Doesn't really matter if there's 1/16" of trub or 10 feet.
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Old 03-19-2014, 02:37 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by showcow View Post
All this to ask: in your opinion, why does beer using secondary end up clearer? Sounds like because you give it more time... Try leaving it in primary for all of those 10 days plus 2-3 weeks and I think you'll be surprised.

Wait I get it - basically your point is it gives you two chances to siphon, which means less trub in the package.
Yes - 2 chances to siphon. What a secondary offers is a way to pull in less trub when racking. Forgetting about the effort and oxidation /infection risk -
Each time you rack, you will pull in less trub, provided you give the beer time enough to settle. This is because there is progresively less and less sediment (mostly yeast at this point).

It can take longer using the secondary, if you really want to rack less yeast. A primary will clear and then extra time doesn't make it much clearer.

If you are going to take the trouble of using a secondary I'd also advise you cold crash.

Having said this - I usually dont use a secondary, I let it sit in the primary until its bottling time. The cold crashing helps a lot.

Others will say "your racking is the problem, careful racking wont bring over a lot of trub".
I've tried that, and unless I leave behind a couple of beers worth of yeasty beer, I still get too much yeast.
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Old 03-21-2014, 05:08 PM   #17
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I have to ask for some advice on this subject. I have a clone of Bells Two Hearted Ale that has been fermenting 6 days today. I am supposed to dry hop 1 oz of centennial. I know cold crashing helps to clear the solids but I currently have no artificial method to do this.

In my area we are expected to get some below average temps starting Monday til Wednesday of between 30 and 55 degrees. Can I cold crash outside or is the crash not to get below freezing? I was just going to toss the hops in sans bag...


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Old 03-21-2014, 07:17 PM   #18
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Default How to: dry hopping??

Quote:
Originally Posted by catdaddy66 View Post
I have to ask for some advice on this subject. I have a clone of Bells Two Hearted Ale that has been fermenting 6 days today. I am supposed to dry hop 1 oz of centennial. I know cold crashing helps to clear the solids but I currently have no artificial method to do this.

In my area we are expected to get some below average temps starting Monday til Wednesday of between 30 and 55 degrees. Can I cold crash outside or is the crash not to get below freezing? I was just going to toss the hops in sans bag...


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You might find that it takes longer than a few hours for the temp to drop all the aay down. And you need to keep it in the mid-30s for a t least 24 hours after that. I would bag the hops. You don't want huge temp swings like that, even after fermentation is over, and even if it probably won't get above 50.

But what the hell, try it if you don't have a bag! Worst case it doesn't crash the trub well, and in that case you can get a bag later and (after sanitizing) tie it to the end of your siphon. That wa

bottling bucket/keg.

Edit: I didn't see that it's only been 6 days. Let it go two weeks before you dry hop/cold crash, especially if you don't have precise fermentation temp control. Give it time to clean up fermentation before you crash it.
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Old 03-22-2014, 01:49 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by showcow View Post
You might find that it takes longer than a few hours for the temp to drop all the aay down. And you need to keep it in the mid-30s for a t least 24 hours after that. I would bag the hops. You don't want huge temp swings like that, even after fermentation is over, and even if it probably won't get above 50.

But what the hell, try it if you don't have a bag! Worst case it doesn't crash the trub well, and in that case you can get a bag later and (after sanitizing) tie it to the end of your siphon. That wa

bottling bucket/keg.

Edit: I didn't see that it's only been 6 days. Let it go two weeks before you dry hop/cold crash, especially if you don't have precise fermentation temp control. Give it time to clean up fermentation before you crash it.

Thanks Showcow! I guess the temp shouldn't fluctuate so I am not going to be able to cold crash. I was kinda spit balling on that idea anyway... Oh, well.


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Old 03-22-2014, 02:12 PM   #20
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Yeah. Either throw the hops in a bag, or put them in with nothing and tie the bag around the siphon. Either way clean beer to keg or bottles! Cheers


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