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Old 03-02-2014, 12:03 PM   #1
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Default low-carbohydrate the same as low gluten?

IS there any correlation between low-gluten and low carbohydrate beer?


What techniques could one use to lower carbohydrate content of homebrew?
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Old 03-02-2014, 12:19 PM   #2
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No correlation. Carbohydrates come from sugars, no matter the source. These sugars are what drive fermentation and alcohol content. Not sure how one would create a low carb homebrew.
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Old 03-08-2014, 02:42 AM   #3
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Most "low carb" beers are brewed with some adjuncts and start at low OG. Less barley = less gluten, but it certainly doesn't mean low gluten or gluten free.

You can lower the carb content of finished beer by

a) brewing low alcohol versions
b) mash for a dry beer - eg mashing very low or long so that most of the carbs ferment into alcohol.
c) add simple sugars that will 100% convert to alcohol
d) brew lagers. Lager yeast eat a wider range of carbs

Of course, those will make your homebrew taste and feel a whole lot more like the commercial versions you are trying to avoid.
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Old 03-08-2014, 03:46 AM   #4
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Clarity Ferm!
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:29 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billl View Post
Most "low carb" beers are brewed with some adjuncts and start at low OG. Less barley = less gluten, but it certainly doesn't mean low gluten or gluten free.

You can lower the carb content of finished beer by

a) brewing low alcohol versions
b) mash for a dry beer - eg mashing very low or long so that most of the carbs ferment into alcohol.
c) add simple sugars that will 100% convert to alcohol
d) brew lagers. Lager yeast eat a wider range of carbs

Of course, those will make your homebrew taste and feel a whole lot more like the commercial versions you are trying to avoid.

Thanks, I am not necessarily trying to avoid commercial versions, I would be very happy to brew a Mich Ultra. I would like to have a lighter option (specifically carbs and gluten) on half of my taps.

I plan to try lowering OG and lager yeast and mashing low and (also the clarity-ferm idea thanks butterpants). Your comment on using adjuncts vs barley was interesting. I understand simple sugar fermenting completely, but which other adjuncts are a better option than barley that would be both low-carb and low gluten, but still add favorable( read malt-like ) flavors in beer?




Also if anyone knows... Do certain malts contain more carbs and gluten than others? I can assume wheat malt would have high gluten, but what effects do roasting techniques used on crystal malts, or even roasted barley have on finished beer carb and gluten levels?
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:56 PM   #6
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" I understand simple sugar fermenting completely, but which other adjuncts are a better option than barley that would be both low-carb and low gluten, but still add favorable( read malt-like ) flavors in beer?"

Corn and rice are neutral flavors used in some commercial versions and are gluten free. Subbing out some of the pilsner for those will lower gluten levels.

If you want a really low carb beer, I'm talking a low and long mash and possibly adding some extra enzymes. Somethings like 2 hours at 145 and then raise to 155 to finish.
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Old 03-08-2014, 01:00 PM   #7
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Thanks, what would raising to 155* accomplish after 2 hours @ 145? ( I only ask because I mash in a cooler ).
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Old 03-08-2014, 03:09 PM   #8
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That puts it into prime alpha range and any remaining starches will be rapidly broken down. It's a pretty traditional step for getting maximum fermentability. Depending on how much adjuct you use, it may or may not be necessary. Adjuncts don't have enzymes, so the more you use, the more you have to pay attention to getting full conversion.

In a cooler, you just stir in boiling water until you get to the desired temp. There are calculators out there (greenbayrackers etc) that will give you approximate volumes.
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Old 03-17-2014, 01:10 PM   #9
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Remember that if you use corn it doesn't have enzymes sufficient to convert so you will need to add enzymes or cereal mash with something that does.


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Old 03-17-2014, 01:22 PM   #10
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Using brett strains when primary yeast finish up would help go through the remaining carbs and add complexity to the flavor profile.
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