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Old 11-29-2007, 08:02 AM   #1
Drunken Monk
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I just bought a pound of honey malt to use in a recipe. I was thinking of steeping this but I'm pretty sure it has to be mashed to get the flavor and fermentables out. Am I right on this? If so, can someone inform me on how to do this without all the fancy equipment. I have a 3 gallon stock pot and your ordinary kitchen stuff.

Also, do I have to mash with a base grain too? All I have for grain is the honey malt. I'm going with 6 lbs DME for the base of my wort.

I want to do a honey lavender ale. Anyone have any experience using lavender? Any suggestions? Anyone know lavender's IBU

Thanks for the help.
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:08 PM   #2
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How does honey malt differ from honey? I have never heard of honey malt.
Thanks

 
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:40 PM   #3
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I've used honey malt before, but I've never done steeping/PM, so I can't say for sure if it needs to be mashed to get the flavor out. My guess is no. I will say, 1 lb of honey malt will add a lot of flavor, maybe more than you're looking for. Someone else may want to verify on the qty.

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How does honey malt differ from honey? I have never heard of honey malt.
For starters, it's malted barley, not honey. I don't know how they achieve it, but it imparts a honey flavor. Honey itself doesn't really impart much flavor IMO. I think it's just too fermentable and the yeast eat it all up.
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:55 PM   #4
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It's a medium-dark (IIRC, ~75L) crystal malt. I've heard that it works great in conjunction with an addition of regular honey, but that yeah, it's easy to overdo.

EDIT: 25-30L, as described below.
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Brewer
How does honey malt differ from honey? I have never heard of honey malt.
Thanks
Honey malt and regular honey are pretty different in how the affect beer. Regular honey is highly fermentable, which means it will dry out your beer and won't leave much honey flavor. Honey malt is much more unfermentable which means some sweetness and the flavor of honey. If you want to add the flavor of honey to your brew, use the malt. If you want a good fermentable to boost ABV, use regular honey...
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:17 PM   #6
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Honey malt: Honey malt is the company's best description for the unique European malt known as brumalt. Its intense malt sweetness makes it perfect for any specialty beer. It has a color profile of 20-30 °L and is devoid of astringent roast flavors.
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From Paddock Wood Brewing:
"Malt sweetness and honey like flavour and aroma make it perfect for any specialty beer. The closest comparison is a light caramel, but Honey Malt has a flavour of its own: sweet and a little bit nutty. Made by restricting the oxygen flow during the sprouting process, Honey Malt is essentially self-stewed. When the oxygen is cut off, the grain bed heats up, developing sugars and rich malt flavours. The malt is lightly kilned for a color color profile of 25 SRM and is devoid of astringent roast flavors. Honey malt has a diastatic power of 50, and can convert itself but not additional adjuncts. It is best mashed with a base malt. Use up to 25% in specialty beers for a unique flavour."
These are two of the better descriptions I could find. I was curious about this malt as well, so I did a little poking around. Most sources equate honey malt with European brumalt, which does need to be mashed, but given the description above, most notably "self stewed," I'd say it's probably a form of crystal malt that can be steeped rather than mashed, but that's just a guess.

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Old 11-29-2007, 02:09 PM   #7
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Yep, you just need to steep honey malt. I've never used it, myself, but I have heard many comments like above (i.e., be careful about your quantity).


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Old 11-29-2007, 02:20 PM   #8
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I steeped 1 lb of honey malt in a "honey wheat" beer and it was way overkill! You might want to pull back to 0.5lb first. Just my 2¢...
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Old 11-29-2007, 04:47 PM   #9
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Thanks for the input guys. looks like I'll steep 1/2 a pound and see what happens.
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Old 11-29-2007, 10:37 PM   #10
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Quote:
Honey malt has a diastatic power of 50, and can convert itself
Key point, so steep/mash at 152F
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