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Old 02-24-2014, 12:49 PM   #1
BrettPreston
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Dec 2013
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Hi all.

So, last week, Wednesday I started my 2nd ever brew. It's an export stout kit from Simply.

I followed the instructions / continue to use mr knowledge from first brew. I added some vanilla extract and black treacle to the bin along with 1Kg of beer enhancer in place of the sugar.

Mixed it all up, put it in place and put the brew belt on. The temp has stayed between 24-26 since. The bin seem pressured as the lid is tight and pushed up if that makes sense.

However, my worry is... I got some action in terms of foaming on the thrusday, however it only lasted a around a day if not less and not loads of it. It's now all gone and no foam.

What's this mean? Is it ok?

I've not got it with me but when I took a hydro reading before putting the lid on, on brew day it was 1046 I think!

Thanks for any help.


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Old 02-24-2014, 01:01 PM   #2
TerranceKwong
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It's probably ok 24-26 is pretty warm, what yeast did you use. It did krausen so it's probably chugging along. Whats the gravity now?

 
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Old 02-24-2014, 01:03 PM   #3
BrettPreston
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Dec 2013
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Oh the instruction say to keep it at around 25C? What temp would you keep it at?

I've not done it again, as I don't wanna take to many readings / open lid to often! I was going to take a reading after 7/8 days as that was recommended time?

Thanks!


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Old 02-24-2014, 01:04 PM   #4
kombat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrettPreston View Post
Mixed it all up, put it in place and put the brew belt on. The temp has stayed between 24-26 since.
That's either waaaaay too hot (assuming that's C) or way too cold (if F). I'm guessing you'd notice if your beer froze solid, so that's gotta be C, which is around 79 F. That is much, much too hot for beer. If you started this kit last Wednesday, then fermentation has already finished and I'm afraid this batch will be undrinkable. You fermented at least 10F too hot. You should never, never use a heating belt on your beer except when connected to a temperature controller like an STC-1000.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrettPreston View Post
However, my worry is... I got some action in terms of foaming on the thrusday, however it only lasted a around a day if not less and not loads of it. It's now all gone and no foam.

What's this mean? Is it ok?
It means you fermented much too hot and the yeast got overexcited and fermented much too quickly. In doing so, they produced a ton of off flavours, the worst of which will be fusel alcohols (tastes like nail polish remover).

I'm sorry this happened to you, but who told you to put the heating belt on the beer? You've gotten some bad advice. Temperature control is extremely important in producing good beer, and for most ale yeasts, the sweet spot is between 62-65 F (17-18 C). I hope this beer will be a good learning experience for you, but for next time, it's crucial that you keep the beer's temperature between 62-65F, at least for those critical first 2-3 days of fermentation. Google "swamp cooler" for threads describing a cheap way to do so using a simple plastic laundry tub, water, and a t-shirt.

Good luck, don't give up!

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Old 02-24-2014, 01:11 PM   #5
KeyWestBrewing
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That's pretty warm to ferment at. If you can in the future try to keep the temp in the 18-20C range. Given the temp you fermented at and the OG reading you took I'd say its probably finished fermenting. Smaller beers don't always get a huge high krausen so there's no worry there. Give it another week or two and bottle/keg it up. Definitely look to try and lower the temps in the future though. Fermenting that warm can give you fusels and create some weird esters.
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Old 02-24-2014, 01:16 PM   #6
TerranceKwong
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Judging by the time you posted and the suggested temp and using celcius etc. maybe you are an aussie and maybe you had coopers yeast? if you did it will probably be ok

 
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Old 02-24-2014, 01:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kombat View Post
That's either waaaaay too hot (assuming that's C) or way too cold (if F). I'm guessing you'd notice if your beer froze solid, so that's gotta be C, which is around 79 F. That is much, much too hot for beer. If you started this kit last Wednesday, then fermentation has already finished and I'm afraid this batch will be undrinkable. You fermented at least 10F too hot. You should never, never use a heating belt on your beer except when connected to a temperature controller like an STC-1000.



It means you fermented much too hot and the yeast got overexcited and fermented much too quickly. In doing so, they produced a ton of off flavours, the worst of which will be fusel alcohols (tastes like nail polish remover).

I'm sorry this happened to you, but who told you to put the heating belt on the beer? You've gotten some bad advice. Temperature control is extremely important in producing good beer, and for most ale yeasts, the sweet spot is between 62-65 F (17-18 C). I hope this beer will be a good learning experience for you, but for next time, it's crucial that you keep the beer's temperature between 62-65F, at least for those critical first 2-3 days of fermentation. Google "swamp cooler" for threads describing a cheap way to do so using a simple plastic laundry tub, water, and a t-shirt.

Good luck, don't give up!
+1. Next time, do it at cooler temps and enjoy the goodness. What could your temp have been without the brew belt?

Kit instruction (of which there are apparently many) that encourage folks to pitch and begin the ferment (of anything but a saison) at those mid-upper 70's temps are just plain wrong. They result in lots of frustration and discouragement when the beer turns out tasting like a**.
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Old 02-24-2014, 01:33 PM   #8
Rkoory
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kombat View Post
If you started this kit last Wednesday, then fermentation has already finished and I'm afraid this batch will be undrinkable. You fermented at least 10F too hot.
I would not give up on your beer yet.

24 is a bit high. I don't use artificial temperature controls on my ales, but rather rely on the ambient temperature of my basement which is typically a steady 69 to 71 (around 21 in Celsius).

I have had a few beers which seem to blow through their fermentation activity within about 24 hours. Not all of them have been great award-winning beers that I hand to my friends and family. However, many of them have turned out to be just fine, and even some have been darn good.

If your gravity is looking good when your check it next, then don't judge the beer before you try it. It might not be great, but its likely that it will be drinkable, and the experience will make you a more wise more brewer.

 
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Old 02-24-2014, 01:49 PM   #9
roger_tucker
 
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I'd agree that's a bit warm to ferment. I does depend on the yeast strain, but in general what every one is saying here is correct. Ideal temperature for an ale yeast is probably around 67 degrees. Just to give you an example of the other end of the extremes, a saison yeast should be upwards of 80+ degrees for fermentation while lager yeast might need to be in the 50 degree or lower range.

Also it is not uncommon for the krausen (the heavy foaming) to start pull back after only a day or two. Primary fermentation in an ale might only last four days or so.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter8-2-2.html

I wouldn't call the beer ruined until you bottle it and try it. It still may end up being very drinkable (maybe just not perfect)

 
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Old 02-24-2014, 01:50 PM   #10
roger_tucker
 
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I'd agree that's a bit warm to ferment. I does depend on the yeast strain, but in general what every one is saying here is correct. Ideal temperature for an ale yeast is probably around 67 degrees. Just to give you an example of the other end of the extremes, a saison yeast should be upwards of 80+ degrees for fermentation while lager yeast might need to be in the 50 degree or lower range.

Also it is not uncommon for the krausen (the heavy foaming) to start pull back after only a day or two. Primary fermentation in an ale might only last four days or so.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter8-2-2.html

I wouldn't call the beer ruined until you bottle it and try it. It still may end up being very drinkable (maybe just not perfect)

 
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