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Old 01-15-2013, 11:00 PM   #21
dariussadeli
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thanks for the info gents!!


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Old 11-11-2013, 12:30 AM   #22
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That's mighty dry. Well, does it taste like good lemonade? A lot of people like it dry. If you want it sweeter, you might want to add some more or the original juice. You could try adding a little bit and see if fermentation starts back up. If so, I would add enough to take it up to 1.015 or so and then let it ferment back down to taste. Or if you got all the yeast out when you racked it, just add juice to taste. It shouldnt take much, maybe a quart or two in 5 gal. I just checked out my WLP300 batch with no sugar and it still has a ways to go at 1.024. It tastes very good though. I crashed a few others that I started at the same time (11/15) and were further along in fermentation WLP302 at 1.004, Nottingham at 1.010 and Safale S04 at 1.010. Of the six yeasts I tested in this last round the WLP300 took the longest to start.
So does this mean after you cold crash you can store in bottles at RT or will you have to keep it in the fridge?


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Old 04-21-2014, 09:12 PM   #23
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When you place the carboy in the fridge do you put a stopper that has a hole in it on the top or can I put the cap back on the 1 gallon bottle I bought at the store and not worry about an explosion?

Once it cold crashes can I leave it in the 1 gallon carboy and add malic acid etc. then enjoy?

And should I keep the carboy in the fridge or can I put it back in the closet?

I live in California so it's really never too cold but can get hot here in the summer.

Thank you
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Old 10-06-2014, 05:35 PM   #24
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After cold crashing, does the cider have to be stored in a refrigerator or can it be stored at room temperature?
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Old 10-06-2014, 07:12 PM   #25
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Must be refrigerated if there is any unfermented sugar in it. Otherwise the yeasts will wake up again and start having lunch.
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Old 10-06-2014, 09:58 PM   #26
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Do you have it bottled yet, or are you not? If not, how are you serving out of a carboy? What do I not understand?
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Old 10-07-2014, 02:13 PM   #27
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After cold crashing, does the cider have to be stored in a refrigerator or can it be stored at room temperature?
If you cold crash successfully, you can store the cider at room temperature afterwards. I have a fair number of kegs and dozens of bottles from previous seasons that have been stored in my basement for 1+ years at ambient temperature.

However cold crashing successfully is not easy to pull off the first time. You need to start with low nutrient juice - ie old standard trees that havent been fertilized in a while, or juice from an organic orchard. You need to use a strain of yeast that flocs at low temps, be careful when you rack, and keep an eye on the carboy after you rack in case it starts back up. Then, once you have cold crashed successfully and removed essentially all of the yeast, you will need to force carbonate (ie kegs and CO2) if you want carbonation. Its doable, but for someone starting out, you are likely to get better results with the pasteurization method in the sticky, or keep the cider in the fridge afterwards if you want a sweet or semi sweet carbonated cider.
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Old 10-07-2014, 05:17 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CvilleKevin View Post
If you cold crash successfully, you can store the cider at room temperature afterwards. I have a fair number of kegs and dozens of bottles from previous seasons that have been stored in my basement for 1+ years at ambient temperature.

However cold crashing successfully is not easy to pull off the first time. You need to start with low nutrient juice - ie old standard trees that havent been fertilized in a while, or juice from an organic orchard. You need to use a strain of yeast that flocs at low temps, be careful when you rack, and keep an eye on the carboy after you rack in case it starts back up. Then, once you have cold crashed successfully and removed essentially all of the yeast, you will need to force carbonate (ie kegs and CO2) if you want carbonation. Its doable, but for someone starting out, you are likely to get better results with the pasteurization method in the sticky, or keep the cider in the fridge afterwards if you want a sweet or semi sweet carbonated cider.

Wonderful explanation CvilleKevin. Do you have any recommendations for FG or other ways to measure when a cider is semi-dry or semi-sweet (dry with a bit of sweetness in it)?
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Old 10-07-2014, 05:59 PM   #29
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Cider isn't going to carb too much at all in the fridge. You will get a little hint of a fffft when you open the cap, but nothing more.

The reason for cold crashing is to force your yeast to flocculate before it's ready to do so on it's own.

The reason why I cold crash is because I generally make cider with a champagne yeast that takes a week to flocculate on it's own and I want to drink some cider when fermentation is finished instead of waiting for a week. I don't typically cold crash the entire batch, rather about 6 liters into the fridge in PET bottles and then airlock the remainder into smaller secondary jugs and let it clear on it's own.

You can also cold crash before fermentation is finished if you want to preserve some sweetness. If you warm the stuff up again and it's in a container without pressure relief, it will either carbonate or explode.
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Old 10-08-2014, 03:53 AM   #30
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Quote:
Do you have any recommendations for FG or other ways to measure when a cider is semi-dry or semi-sweet (dry with a bit of sweetness in it)?
Its mostly a matter of personal taste as to how much residual apple sugar balances the acid in the apples, also somewhat the yeast. I usually like about 1.008 to 1.010 for a British Ale yeast. Some of my friends like it a little drier, OTOH - I just crashed a Wy3068 batch at 1.022 for my girlfriend and that was just barely sweet enough. When the cider is fermenting, it tastes a little more acidic than it will when you've knocked the yeast out, so if you wait until its just a bit drier tasting than what you want, you will usually have a nice balance after the crash.


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