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Old 02-14-2014, 04:18 AM   #1
mikescooling
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Default 23amps and 14gauge wire, only used in panel?

Hey guys, I'm only talking about hooking one component to another, only inside the panel. ONLY IN THE PANEL, you can use smaller wire, because the runs are shorter, is what I'm reading? It's called open air wire rating.
Found a calculator
http://www.gorhamschaffler.com/wire_...alculator.html

http://wiktel.com/standards/ampacit.htm

And again this tread is about panel wire size from component to component. I've had a few of my threads locked for name calling, so lets be better than that. Thanks for any helpful input?


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Old 02-14-2014, 04:25 AM   #2
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If you have the 14 ga wire and no 12 then I can understand why you would ask. Aside from that I would highly recommend you use 10 ga.

Its not technically free air. Free air is when the wire is suspended on poles outside. The higher ampacity is from the air circulation around the wire dissipating the heat quicker. Inside a panel it is no longer free air.

Technically you could get away with 12 ga wire as the nec says that its rated for 23 amps, but I still recommend 10 ga.


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Old 02-14-2014, 04:34 AM   #3
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Good to know, thank-you Facinerous. I was reading about it and thought I'd ask. I have a boat load of wire, so I could do 10 gauge. It seemed like a good topic. I'm doing my panel build now, looks like this
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Old 02-14-2014, 04:47 AM   #4
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Well its lookin good. It will be pretty crammed with wire by the time you are done I am thinking.
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:36 PM   #5
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What is the trick on connecting 10 awg to the smaller terminals, that most of the components have. For example- from the switch to the contactor.
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:45 PM   #6
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The wires that control relays and contactors are not carrying a 23 amp load. These are low amperage so 14 gauge would be fine. On most applications the only 10 awg you should need would be your line in and the wires feeding the elements on the load side of a contactor or SSR.

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Old 02-14-2014, 07:17 PM   #7
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For control wiring, I stepped down to 24volts, so you can use much smaller wire. The panel is not finished, I have no switches or light yet, but I'm getting closer by the day. And I have to have my new BK TIG welded. Then I can brew again.
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Old 02-14-2014, 11:23 PM   #8
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Yes in a cabinet is considered a free air application. When they are talking about transmission wire they are talking about wire in a cable or conduit.
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Old 02-15-2014, 06:54 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikescooling View Post
Hey guys, I'm only talking about hooking one component to another, only inside the panel. ONLY IN THE PANEL, you can use smaller wire, because the runs are shorter, is what I'm reading? It's called open air wire rating.
Found a calculator
http://www.gorhamschaffler.com/wire_...alculator.html

http://wiktel.com/standards/ampacit.htm

And again this tread is about panel wire size from component to component. I've had a few of my threads locked for name calling, so lets be better than that. Thanks for any helpful input?
Here are the maximum ampacities for chassis wiring, which is not the same as the NEC Code ratings for the romex cable in your house walls.

#14 THHN copper wire is good for up to 25 Amps
#12 THHN copper wire is good for up to 30 Amps
#10 THHN copper wire is good for up to 40 Amps

These ratings come from The Handbook of Electronic Tables and Formulas for American Wire Gauge. This data is also in NEC Table 310-16.
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Old 02-15-2014, 07:48 AM   #10
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I used 18ga behind a 6a circuit breaker on the low amperage hookups, PID power, etc.

I've used #10 for the 25a circuits with 12/3 SO for the element cords. Nothing gets hot.

NFPA 70 is the often quoted electrical code, but in my opinion, NFPA 79 is the code which fits these panels better. Unfortunately I don't have a copy of it.


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