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Old 02-11-2014, 07:17 AM   #1
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Default BIAB Canned Wort...Movie

This here BIAB stuff is starting to become addicting. I got to thinking about using the technique for an easy way to brew up a batch of light gravity wort & canning it for later use as a yeast starter...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcGuv6_hUnM


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Old 02-11-2014, 07:45 AM   #2
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That's a very nice canner.


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Old 02-11-2014, 01:33 PM   #3
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I save beer from my kettle when I add the chiller in the last 10 min. of boil--it's way easier than the video shows I just steel a pint or two--have a sauce pan with your jar lid & ring in boiling water pull a jar out fill with beer put the lid and ring on don't get crazy tightening the ring!--set the jar aside and wait for it to seal you'll hear it snap when it cools it sucks the lid down and makes the seal-new lids have a little dome in the middle once sealed it will be slightly concave--
I can tomatoes & tomatoe juice using this method and have been doing it this way as long as I can remember--you don't need no pressure cooker to do it.
This is called cold packing.
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Old 02-11-2014, 01:46 PM   #4
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Dick Dale music?
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This beer smells a lot like cat piss ... I think I'm gonna LIKE it !!
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Old 02-11-2014, 04:00 PM   #5
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You do need a pressure canner (not pressure cooker).
What you suggest has a very small possibility of botulism.
I'm not saying it's likely, it's very unlikely, and it's certainly convenient so I can see why you would want to do it.
But what you propose can kill someone or at least send them (and others that drink your beer) to the hospital for a multi-day treatment. That could result in a lawsuit against you as well.


If you use No-Chill brewing, you should use your wort soon, and not keep it stored in your container for months. The risk of Botulism is low, but it's not 0. Use your no-chill wort soon after you make it.


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Originally Posted by browder View Post
I save beer from my kettle when I add the chiller in the last 10 min. of boil--it's way easier than the video shows I just steel a pint or two--have a sauce pan with your jar lid & ring in boiling water pull a jar out fill with beer put the lid and ring on don't get crazy tightening the ring!--set the jar aside and wait for it to seal you'll hear it snap when it cools it sucks the lid down and makes the seal-new lids have a little dome in the middle once sealed it will be slightly concave--
I can tomatoes & tomatoe juice using this method and have been doing it this way as long as I can remember--you don't need no pressure cooker to do it.
This is called cold packing.
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Old 02-11-2014, 05:52 PM   #6
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Well looks like a pressure cooker to me if the lid locks on & it has a pressure hole & gauge on it--I'm just saying your jars will seal properly without the use of a pressure cooker that's the way people can veg's simple to do and if done right no worries of anything going bad--same principal would apply to the guys that are saving wort--I use Mason jars because there is always any where from one to a half dozen sittin around the kitchen--you've got a good idea but keep it simple--boil some beer save a quart and put the rest in the fermenter.
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Old 02-11-2014, 06:18 PM   #7
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Quote:
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Well looks like a pressure cooker to me if the lid locks on & it has a pressure hole & gauge on it
It's not. Pressure cookers often max out at 10-12 psi, which will only get the contents up to around 235 - 240 F. Pressure canners are specifically designed to achieve 250 F at 15 psi, which is necessary to completely eradicate botulism causing spores.

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--I'm just saying your jars will seal properly without the use of a pressure cooker
True, the jars will definitely seal, locking in the contaminated wort.

Just because the lid "snaps" down doesn't mean the contents are sterile.

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that's the way people can veg's simple to do and if done right no worries of anything going bad
Certain vegetables can be safely canned in a water bath without being under pressure, because their acidic brine is inhospitable to botulism-causing spores. Sugary materials (like beer wort) are a completely different story, and require high temperature (250 F) and time to ensure all contaminants are killed. Since water boils at 212 F, the most practical way to achieve 250 F in a home kitchen is by using a pressure canner.

Boiling the wort kills almost all contaminants. ALMOST all.

The only way to ensure your wort is COMPLETELY sterile is by heating it to 250 F, typically in a pressure canner.

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--same principal would apply to the guys that are saving wort
No, because the composition of the liquids are different. One is sweet and one is acidic. They have different pH values.

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boil some beer save a quart and put the rest in the fermenter.
That's fine if you're going to freeze it. But if you're going to just store it at room temperature and treat it like a canned good, you are playing with fire, because it has NOT been sterilized. Since you're using canning jars with the "snap" lids, you will not get exploding jars (unless you screw on the locking rings), but it's only a matter of time before the wort becomes contaminated and unusable.
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Old 02-11-2014, 06:42 PM   #8
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You sound kinda smart--I'm impressed
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:01 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kombat View Post
It's not. Pressure cookers often max out at 10-12 psi, which will only get the contents up to around 235 - 240 F. Pressure canners are specifically designed to achieve 250 F at 15 psi, which is necessary to completely eradicate botulism causing spores.



True, the jars will definitely seal, locking in the contaminated wort.

Just because the lid "snaps" down doesn't mean the contents are sterile.



Certain vegetables can be safely canned in a water bath without being under pressure, because their acidic brine is inhospitable to botulism-causing spores. Sugary materials (like beer wort) are a completely different story, and require high temperature (250 F) and time to ensure all contaminants are killed. Since water boils at 212 F, the most practical way to achieve 250 F in a home kitchen is by using a pressure canner.

Boiling the wort kills almost all contaminants. ALMOST all.

The only way to ensure your wort is COMPLETELY sterile is by heating it to 250 F, typically in a pressure canner.



No, because the composition of the liquids are different. One is sweet and one is acidic. They have different pH values.



That's fine if you're going to freeze it. But if you're going to just store it at room temperature and treat it like a canned good, you are playing with fire, because it has NOT been sterilized. Since you're using canning jars with the "snap" lids, you will not get exploding jars (unless you screw on the locking rings), but it's only a matter of time before the wort becomes contaminated and unusable.
I should save this reply, and paste it whenever the water bath v. canning discussion come up (and it does often). Good explanation.
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Old 02-12-2014, 03:02 AM   #10
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Its a good video.

One more tip for canning wort - you don't have to make "weak" 1.037 wort. Instead what you can do is use many small jars with higher gravities, that when poured into a flask, that is then topped off to 1 liter will results in 1.037 wort.
This way you can make many smaller jars rather than fewer larger jars.

This both saves space, and lets you prepare a lot of wort jars.


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