When not to dry hop? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 02-10-2014, 01:40 PM   #1
-Liam-
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Since I've started scanning through IPA recipes, I've noticed many that do require dry hopping and many that don't. It made me wonder what the reasons are for not dry hopping? Surely all IPAs would benefit from it or am I missing something?



 
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Old 02-10-2014, 01:54 PM   #2
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I prefer to dry hop all my IPA's. But some might use hop bursting late in the boil for bittering,flavor & some aroma. Others might do hop additions in the last couple minutes of the boil for aroma. But I think dry hopping gives the most aroma.


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Old 02-10-2014, 02:02 PM   #3
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I can't imagine making an IPA and not dry hopping. I love the aromas when swirling the glass and I've made hoppy non-IPA beers that weren't dry hopped and the aroma just isn't the same.
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Old 02-10-2014, 02:06 PM   #4
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If you don't dry hop it, it's not an IPA.

Dry hopping is the best way to get that distinctive, in-your-face aroma as you bring the glass to your lips. It's characteristic of the IPA style and therefore, in my opinion, dry hopping is mandatory.

 
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Old 02-10-2014, 06:00 PM   #5
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I dry hop all my IPAs...really adds to the aroma.
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Old 02-10-2014, 06:09 PM   #6
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Do not want dry hop if you're trying to make an IPA with little hop aroma.

 
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Old 02-10-2014, 06:12 PM   #7
chezhed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by novahokie09 View Post
Do not want dry hop if you're trying to make an IPA with little hop aroma.
Then I wouldn't think it would be an IPA.......from the BJCP style guidelines:
"A prominent to intense hop aroma that can be derived from American, English and/or noble varieties (although a citrusy hop character is almost always present)."

Like others, I always dry hop and IPA....though I currently have an experiment where the "dry hopping" is in the keg....many have done it but I never had till now.
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Old 02-10-2014, 06:27 PM   #8
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English IPAs don't need to be dry hopped. If you're going for the intensity of an American IPA, it *should* but doesn't have to be dry hopped. Adding a good burst at flame out and doing a hop stand will give you pretty decent hope aroma, especially while it's fresh.
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Old 02-10-2014, 06:38 PM   #9
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I have no idea why anyone would make an IPA without dry hopping. It adds hop aroma to the beer, and since our sense of taste is influenced greatly by our sense of smell, adding aroma literally adds flavor. If you're not interested in the hop flavor, then why are you making an IPA?

I would always dry-hop an IPA, even if I was brewing a recipe that didn't call for it.
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Old 02-10-2014, 08:19 PM   #10
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OP, it's up to your discretion whether you dry hop or not. Unlike what many others have said, it is possible to create an IPA without dry hopping. That being said, it will lack the strong nose and taste that many (especially during the current hop-craze we're experiencing) are looking for. That doesn't mean you won't get a strong nose and taste. If you add a good number of hops at flame out, do a hop stand, and transfer the trub along with the wort into the fermenter, you can have decent results. I've tried IPAs that have used this technique and haven't been disappointed.

My personal preference is to dry hop, but, again, it's not required. If you're looking for something to enter into a competition, just make sure it's young and have it tasted by a certified judge before you do enter it. They can give you some guidelines on what category to enter it into, and how it may do in competition.


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