Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Final pH of beer high
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-24-2014, 02:23 PM   #11
hottpeper13
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Mequon, Wisconsin
Posts: 169
Liked 16 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

I don't recall which book I read this in, they stated that mash ph should be measured at mash temps not 77f


hottpeper13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2014, 02:45 PM   #12
kcbeersnob
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: , Kansas
Posts: 146
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hottpeper13 View Post
I don't recall which book I read this in, they stated that mash ph should be measured at mash temps not 77f
pH should always be measured at room temp. There's nothing special about mash pH that would require special treatment. Also note that this thread is not about mash pH. It's about finishing beer pH.


kcbeersnob is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2014, 03:48 PM   #13
brewmeister13
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Tucson, Arizona
Posts: 482
Liked 33 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kcbeersnob View Post
I aerate all of my wort using 60 seconds of O2, so that's definitely not the problem.



I tested all 6 of my draft beers yesterday. All three that were fermented with Wyeast 1056 ended high (>4.7). All of the beers fermented with English yeast (1028 or 1968) or Irish ale (WLP004) finished lower (<4.5).



Perhaps 1056 is a lower acid producer.

The beer that showed significantly lower pH was actually given 3 minutes of O2 at .5LPM for only .75 gallons. With that said I don't think I would recommend oxygenating that much.

That's pretty good information on the different yeast strains. Thanks for sharing that. I just used WLP007 for the first time and will have to see if it displays the same characteristics.
brewmeister13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2014, 04:33 PM   #14
kcbeersnob
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: , Kansas
Posts: 146
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brewmeister13 View Post
That's pretty good information on the different yeast strains. Thanks for sharing that. I just used WLP007 for the first time and will have to see if it displays the same characteristics.
Here are the specific measurements:
  • Porter- 4.55 (Wyeast 1028)
  • Pale ale - 4.92 (1056)
  • Rye IPA - 4.78 (1056)
  • Oatmeal Stout - 4.43 (1968)
  • Irish ale - 4.18 (WLP004 - post-boil pH was 5.15)
  • "Snow Cone" IPA - 4.83 (1056)

In about 10-14 days, I'll have the final pH for the Irish stout I brewed yesterday (using WLP004) to see if it behaves similarly to the Irish ale above.

I'm planning to brew a pale ale next weekend using 1056. I'll keep good pH records and will report back on the results.
kcbeersnob is offline
dgrieve Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2014, 03:45 AM   #15
kcbeersnob
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: , Kansas
Posts: 146
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

A couple new measurements to share:
  • Dry Stout - 4.01 (WLP004 - post-boil pH 5.09)
  • Pale Ale - 4.54 (Wyeast 1056 - post boil pH 5.28)

The WLP004 pH drop was quite consistent between both batches.

I measured pH of the pale ale 10 days after pitching. Previous measurements of beers fermented with 1056 were taken after at least 3 weeks. It's possible that pH was slightly lower in the previous batches, but rose after spending a few extra days in the carboy and then additional time on yeast sediment in the keg.
kcbeersnob is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2014, 12:41 PM   #16
zwiller
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Sandusky, Ohio
Posts: 281
Liked 23 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

The 1056 data seems to align itself with Strong's interview with SN regarding their mash targets (5.1-5.3). That's quite low IMO, so perhaps they're compensating for low acid production. It would be nice to measure the final pH of SNPA for this discussion.

I am moving away from 1056 and going with WL007, so I anxious to see brewmeister's data.

In some ways, I wish I had a meter again and I would gather more data for us, but my relationship with meters is love/hate (mostly hate). Enjoying bliss for the moment...
zwiller is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2014, 01:03 AM   #17
kcbeersnob
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: , Kansas
Posts: 146
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zwiller View Post
I am moving away from 1056 and going with WL007, so I anxious to see brewmeister's data.
From WL's product description ("This yeast is similar to WLP002 in flavor profile, but is 10% more attenuative") I would expect WLP007 to be very fruity. Do you find that's not the case?

I've got a vial in my fridge now. I'm planning to brew a Barley Wine or Imperial Stout with it.
kcbeersnob is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2014, 12:39 PM   #18
zwiller
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Sandusky, Ohio
Posts: 281
Liked 23 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

Never used WL007 before and just picked it up last night. Got a hefe on deck before I get to it...

KC, do/did you make starters? I rarely did as my LHBS always had really fresh 1056 but will need to since the WL is a few months old. Wonder if there could be a correlation to more yeast dropping pH further?
zwiller is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2014, 09:10 PM   #19
brewmeister13
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Tucson, Arizona
Posts: 482
Liked 33 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kcbeersnob View Post
A couple new measurements to share:
  • Dry Stout - 4.01 (WLP004 - post-boil pH 5.09)
  • Pale Ale - 4.54 (Wyeast 1056 - post boil pH 5.28)

The WLP004 pH drop was quite consistent between both batches.

I measured pH of the pale ale 10 days after pitching. Previous measurements of beers fermented with 1056 were taken after at least 3 weeks. It's possible that pH was slightly lower in the previous batches, but rose after spending a few extra days in the carboy and then additional time on yeast sediment in the keg.
Awesome. I'll have to go back through all of my records and try to post what I have. Thanks KC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zwiller View Post
I am moving away from 1056 and going with WL007, so I anxious to see brewmeister's data.
It may be a little while yet. The beer I brewed with WLP007 was an extremely big beer, 1.135, and is still fermenting away 3 weeks later. Next time I take a hydro sample though, probably in a week or so, I'll check the pH and report back with it.
brewmeister13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2014, 01:52 AM   #20
kcbeersnob
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: , Kansas
Posts: 146
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zwiller View Post
Never used WL007 before and just picked it up last night. Got a hefe on deck before I get to it...
It's going to be a while for me too. I've got 2-3 batches lined up before I get to my barleywine or imperial stout.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zwiller View Post
KC, do/did you make starters? I rarely did as my LHBS always had really fresh 1056 but will need to since the WL is a few months old. Wonder if there could be a correlation to more yeast dropping pH further?
I always make a starter, so I don't think that's a factor in my case (comparing results for my own batches).

I brewed a batch recently using WLP060, which is a blend of WLP001 and two other strains that lend slight lager-like characteristics. I assume WLP001 would behave similarly to 1056. I'm really looking forward to seeing how the additional strains affect finished pH. Should be able to measure that in the next couple days.


kcbeersnob is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is a high final gravity, dry (unsweet) beer theoretically possible? huskeypm Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 04-18-2013 09:15 PM
dry beer with high final gravity? huskeypm Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 18 04-07-2013 10:11 PM
High Rye - sweet final beer? brycelarson All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 03-29-2013 01:02 PM
First batch of beer and high final SG 2-0turbo Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 05-11-2009 07:57 AM
Beer Smith Final Gravity Too High? Teddypower Brewing Software 7 03-24-2009 12:38 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS