how to cultivate my own yeasts - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > how to cultivate my own yeasts

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-26-2013, 05:43 PM   #1
Edbert
Recipes 
 
Jul 2013
Austin, TX
Posts: 124
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts



Sorry for asking what is obviously a noob question but I am confused by the terms. I do not want to wash old yeasts I just want to be able to buy fewer vials and packs of liquid yeast to lower costs. I did a batch of beer with dry yeast with decent results but the best batches seem to come from liquid. I have messed around with doing starters but to be honest I've never had trouble with slow fermenting before and do not think it is necessary for me.

However, it seems that I could make a very large batch of "starter" and store up some of it in mason jars for later batches. I suspect it is just not that simple though.

Can anyone explain what the process of growing/cultivating the yeasties from an existing batch is called so I can find the instructions on my own? Or better yet there's probably already a howto here I just need a link.

Thanks in advance!



 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2013, 05:51 PM   #2
MachineShopBrewing
Recipes 
 
Nov 2009
Montrose, MN
Posts: 1,053
Liked 69 Times on 55 Posts


http://www.amazon.com/Yeast-Practica...keywords=yeast


everything you would want to know and more is in this book.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2013, 05:53 PM   #3
Psycotte
Recipes 
 
Sep 2013
Yaphank, New York
Posts: 496
Liked 123 Times on 97 Posts


http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/slanting-yeast-133103/

This explains it very well.
__________________
Bottled: Bass Ale Clone, SL Coffee Stout, Cappy Piss, Dangerous Leprechaun
Primary #1: Turn the Paige Apfelwein
Primary #2: Brutally Brown Ale
Primary #3: Empty and Sad...
Next Up: Thinking....

Untappd: Psycotte
My Untappd brewery
Psychotic Brewing Co.
Brewer's Friend Profile: Curt Cicotte

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerMeDuffMan

You can never be wrong in hating the cowgirls.
Ever.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2013, 06:05 PM   #4
Edbert
Recipes 
 
Jul 2013
Austin, TX
Posts: 124
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Psycotte View Post
Well that is what I was looking for, had no idea what "slanting" meant. After reading that I think I'll stick with buying powdered. Was hoping it was much easier and I could just save some starter.

THANKS!

Psycotte Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2013, 06:07 PM   #5
Psycotte
Recipes 
 
Sep 2013
Yaphank, New York
Posts: 496
Liked 123 Times on 97 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Edbert View Post
Well that is what I was looking for, had no idea what "slanting" meant. After reading that I think I'll stick with buying powdered. Was hoping it was much easier and I could just save some starter.

THANKS!
Anytime. That's what we are here for. Helping each other brew better beer.
__________________
Bottled: Bass Ale Clone, SL Coffee Stout, Cappy Piss, Dangerous Leprechaun
Primary #1: Turn the Paige Apfelwein
Primary #2: Brutally Brown Ale
Primary #3: Empty and Sad...
Next Up: Thinking....

Untappd: Psycotte
My Untappd brewery
Psychotic Brewing Co.
Brewer's Friend Profile: Curt Cicotte

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerMeDuffMan

You can never be wrong in hating the cowgirls.
Ever.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2013, 07:15 PM   #6
jesserizzo
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
Kansas City, Missouri
Posts: 87
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Edbert View Post
Was hoping it was much easier and I could just save some starter.
You could do that, the only issue is, the yeast will only last a few weeks. With slanting, they will last a year or more.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2013, 07:28 PM   #7
ColoHox
Compulsive Hand Washer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
ColoHox's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
Fort Collins, CO
Posts: 1,876
Liked 403 Times on 287 Posts


I prefer not to slant my yeast stocks, and freeze them instead. I get better viability and it is far less tedious.

Starting with the technique you mentioned...When I am planning on saving some yeast, I basically make a very large starter. When the starter has fermented out, I decant off the spent wort, add glycerol/glycerin (cryopreservative) to reach a 10% concentration and mix thoroughly. I then transfer about 40ml of the thick yeast slurry to 50ml vials and freeze them in a cooler in my chest freezer. When I need the to use the stock, I defrost the vial and make a starter. I have defrosted and used yeast stocks that have been in my freezer for years with great success.

Plating/slanting has its uses. I have used that approach to isolate wild yeast many times. But for the long-term storage of bulk material, freezing is the best approach.
__________________
Bacteria are the only culture some people have.

T29 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2013, 01:17 AM   #8
EarlyAmateurZymurgist
Recipes 
 
Aug 2013
Posts: 480
Liked 120 Times on 74 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoHox View Post
Plating/slanting has its uses. I have used that approach to isolate wild yeast many times. But for the long-term storage of bulk material, freezing is the best approach.
I maintained several brewing yeast cultures for ten years on slant with two year master stock subculture periods (the only reason why the cultures did not last longer is because I lost interest in the hobby). The cultures retained 100% purity because they were plated before being slanted, and all slant-to-slant subcultures were aseptic transfers. Working with -20C or -30C frozen stocks may be more convenient than slanting, but the cultures are lower quality. Short of -70C or lower storage, slants provide the longest viability period because slanted yeast is healthy yeast with ample sterol and UFA stores.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2013, 12:59 PM   #9
vinpaysdoc
Recipes 
 
Sep 2013
Posts: 25
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


http://www.homebrewtalk.com/entries/...-approach.html

Brulosopher's post linked above got me started culturing yeast. I use baby soda bottle test tubes instead of Mason jars to store mine in the refrigerator. The test tubes closely approximate the White Labs tubes. White Labs tubes generally have about a 2 inch yeast cake at the bottom of them for 100 billion cells. I use that to make a rough estimate of how many cells I have in each tube. I'm about 5 months out doing this and have had no problems with fermentation yet.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2013, 02:35 PM   #10
jstebell
Recipes 
 
Nov 2012
Posts: 45
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts


All I do when I need a new strain is obviously buy the vial/smashpack and make a 4l starter with it. Once the starter is fermented out I cold crash decant and split the slurry up into 4 sanitized mason jars. And when ever I get close to running out of a certain strain I just make another starter. It's that easy you never have to wash or buy yeast again. Unless you need a new strain of coarse. Hope this helps.



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Prepping to cultivate my own yeast and have a few questions. JFK Fermentation & Yeast 2 04-19-2013 07:52 AM
cultivate yeast from wild rice pelipen Fermentation & Yeast 6 12-19-2011 08:20 PM
Trying to cultivate Weihenstephaner Wiesbier yeast from the bottle. ed_brews_now Fermentation & Yeast 5 07-24-2011 10:50 PM
Attempting to cultivate from bottle w/ pics rcm_rx7 Fermentation & Yeast 10 03-17-2010 01:10 PM
should I cultivate wild yeast? moger777 Lambic & Wild Brewing 3 05-04-2009 07:36 PM


Forum Jump