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Old 12-03-2013, 06:47 PM   #1
yeastieboys9
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Default Yeast & Pitching Temp

I've just made only my second batch of beer, this time in considerably colder times. I pitched the yeast yesterday at around 16 degrees C and the beer has dropped to around 15 now one day on. The yeast packet said that 15-20 is ideal. Will the fermentation still start at these temperatures? Will heating it up help to start or a day after pitching have I messed it up?

The brew is an American pale ale and the yeast was safale us 05. I've now wrapped the fermenter up in blankets to try and raise the temp but I am not sure if I can leave it at the lower temp? Any help much appreciated for an amateur.


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Old 12-03-2013, 06:56 PM   #2
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You should be fine, if pitched at the lowest temp it might take longer to get fermentation started. Wrapping it is a great Idea to raise the temp to where you want it. I would leave it and just another 12 hours you should start to see bubbles. Once this starts the internal temp will raise from the yeast activities. I wouldnt go above 20C for this style of beer.


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Old 12-03-2013, 07:14 PM   #3
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Great, thanks for the answer. I will keep it wrapped up and wait for some action. Then hopefully the temperature will maintain itself?
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Old 12-05-2013, 12:32 PM   #4
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I left the fermenter for a day more and the reaction has started. Now looking at a cm of foam in top. The temperature has risen to 15 degrees now, does this mean the total fermenting time will be greater? I was planning on leaving it. 3 weeks maximum.
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Old 12-05-2013, 03:10 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by yeastieboys9 View Post
I left the fermenter for a day more and the reaction has started. Now looking at a cm of foam in top. The temperature has risen to 15 degrees now, does this mean the total fermenting time will be greater? I was planning on leaving it. 3 weeks maximum.
Good that its starting to bubble but with that temp going raising up 15 degrees? Is this F or C? You were sitting at 20 and if im assuming 15F your now in the 80's F? thats way too warm I would not keep it covered and if you have a fan circulate cooler air to help the temp drop back to at least 23C. If not you might have some off flavors or you might not.

Why did it increase so much? Ambient temp go up?

Again I would stress out about it let it do its thing it will still be beer!
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Old 12-05-2013, 03:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yeastieboys9 View Post
I left the fermenter for a day more and the reaction has started. Now looking at a cm of foam in top. The temperature has risen to 15 degrees now, does this mean the total fermenting time will be greater? I was planning on leaving it. 3 weeks maximum.
15C (59F?) is on the cold side, but fermentation is exothermic, so it will warm up some, and depending on the ambient air temp, could get too warm, just keep and eye on it. And yes, colder fermentations generally take longer.

You can't really "plan" on when it will be done fermenting, you just have to let it do its thing. Wait for a few days after you see any signs of activity and take a gravity reading. Taste the sample. Wait a few more days and take another reading, and taste. When you have two or three gravity readings that stay the same, and the beer tastes fine, then bottle, or cold crash, or keg - whatever you plan to do next. And above all, have fun, you're two batches in to an AMAZING hobby!
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Old 12-05-2013, 04:16 PM   #7
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15C (59F?) is on the cold side, but fermentation is exothermic, so it will warm up some, and depending on the ambient air temp, could get too warm, just keep and eye on it. And yes, colder fermentations generally take longer.

You can't really "plan" on when it will be done fermenting, you just have to let it do its thing. Wait for a few days after you see any signs of activity and take a gravity reading. Taste the sample. Wait a few more days and take another reading, and taste. When you have two or three gravity readings that stay the same, and the beer tastes fine, then bottle, or cold crash, or keg - whatever you plan to do next. And above all, have fun, you're two batches in to an AMAZING hobby!
Taste, Taste, and More Taste will leave your carboy nice and empty! HAHA
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Old 12-05-2013, 07:59 PM   #8
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Sorry I meant it is now at 15c the temperature hasn't shot up drastically. Hopefully there is some reaction. I'll give it a taste after two weeks and see how it's doing.
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Old 12-05-2013, 10:46 PM   #9
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15c is just fine. us-05 is a machine.
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Old 01-04-2014, 09:16 AM   #10
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Nice one, thanks for all your input. In the end I left it in the primary fermenter for about 4 weeks due to the festive holiday. Looks good bottled so just another few weeks to wait!


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