Adjusting PH - Home Brew Forums
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Old 11-12-2007, 12:57 PM   #1
Gusizhuo
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Sep 2007
Taichung, Taiwan
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I would like to hear as many methods on adjusting the ph of water/wort at various stages in the brew process as possible. In particular I would like to hear methods using ingredients one does NOT necessarily need to go to a brew store to find.



 
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Old 11-12-2007, 02:40 PM   #2
FlyGuy
 
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Jan 2007
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If it helps, I asked a similar question a while back:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=43118

I think most people have switched from pH adjustment with acids or salts to simply using Five Star 5.2 pH stabilizer (a buffer). I actually broke down and have ordered some to try on my next batch.



 
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Old 11-12-2007, 03:02 PM   #3
Professor Frink
 
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+1 on the Fivestar 5.2 pH buffer. It works great and takes all the guesswork out of adjusting the pH.
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Old 11-12-2007, 06:04 PM   #4
Got Trub?
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Apr 2007
Washington State
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Are you having a problem with your mash?

Most potable drinking water for most beer recipes will work fine without any adjustment...

GT

 
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Old 11-12-2007, 06:40 PM   #5
Dr Malt
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Aug 2005
Pacific Northwest
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If you have not already done this, check out John Palmer "How To Brew" chapter 15 on water and mash pH. He suggests calcium sulfate and calcium chloride to lower pH and carbonates (baking soda) to raise pH. I use the baking soda as my mash pH tends to be too low.

From the comments here, the Five Star product seems to work well. A quick search shows it to be about $12 for a pound and you only need a tablespoon per 5 gallons. I have not used it but, I am considering trying some.

If you are going to add acid to your mash, make sure you use an organic acid that yeast can metabolize like acetic, lactic, citric, etc. Also, depending on what type of beer you are making, the pH of the mash will vary. Darker malts are more acidic so you may not need to adjust as much.

I hope this helps.

Dr Malt

 
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Old 11-12-2007, 11:52 PM   #6
Gusizhuo
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Sep 2007
Taichung, Taiwan
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Good thoughts, thanks guys. I am in Taiwan so don't have access to the Five Star product, but it sounds like I can pick some up next time I am in the states maybe. so how many batches would one get out of a 1 pound bag like that?

 
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Old 11-13-2007, 07:27 AM   #7
adam2
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Jun 2007
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you could always get it shiped if you wanted it. I picked up some lactic acid from a local brewery which is what they use but is only effective if you have a relible way of testing eg pH meter. Its very strong stuff and a little goes a long way.



 
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