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Old 11-15-2013, 10:50 PM   #1
codyfree
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Can i buy my honey from some where easy like Walmart or Kroger? If so, what kind?


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Old 11-15-2013, 11:55 PM   #2
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Yes, you can buy honey anywhere. And any kind of honey you want. Each kind of honey has different flavors. Some are lighter in flavor, some have more floral notes, and some are a little fruity. It all depends on what you want your final product to be like. I have bought honey from the grocery store and I have also bought it from walmart. Walmart sells it in larger containers than the grocery stores usually.


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Old 11-15-2013, 11:58 PM   #3
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Just double check the label says it's all honey- they actually have "honey flavored syrup" in a little bear shaped bottles at the dollar stores.
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Old 11-16-2013, 03:16 AM   #4
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I was wondering a similar question as OP. I want to start to experiment with mead and it seems like a large distributer would be a good source of honey to experiment.
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Old 11-16-2013, 07:32 AM   #5
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No, larger places like Walmart etc, will invariably buy it in to a price. It will have likely been processed and blended to hell and back.

You can use it of course, but don't expect a good mead from the honey flavour. If the batch being made has other ingredients that are going to be the likely focus of the flavour, then fine use the cheaper stuff from wherever.

If you're aiming to make a good quality traditional where the honey is going to be the focus of the flavour, then look for a good supplier. Maybe even a local beekeeper......

Your meads will only be as good as the honey.........
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Old 11-16-2013, 09:37 AM   #6
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from American Bee Journal:

Make Sure You Don't Buy

Illegal Honey from China

Check Your Honey with a New Look-Up Tool on www.TrueSourceHoney.com

Washington, D.C. – November 14, 2013 – A new search function on www.TrueSourceHoney.com allows U.S. shoppers to be sure that they’re not mistakenly buying honey that has been illegally shipped from China. In one easy step they can help ensure the safety and quality of their honey, while also supporting U.S. honey producers and beekeepers. In addition, retailers and manufacturers are able to trace their product back to the hive.

By going to www.TrueSourceHoney.com and clicking on the starburst at the top of the page, consumers can enter the UPC code on the back of their packaged honey to see if it is True Source Certified™.

Millions of pounds of illegally sourced honey may continue to enter the United States, despite continuing federal crack-down efforts. True Source CertificationTM helps ensure honey’s safety and quality because it traces the source of that honey from hive to table. The program has been applauded by honey industry leaders, including the American Honey Producers Association and the American Beekeeping Federation.

“The True Source Certified logo tells you that the honey you’re buying was ethically and legally sourced,” says True Source Honey Executive Director Gordon Marks. “If you don’t see the logo, ask your retailer or honey company to join the program. And make sure that your favorite foods with honey – from breakfast cereals to snacks – are made by a manufacturer that purchases honey from a True Source Certified honey company.”

Earlier this year, two of the nation’s largest honey suppliers admitted to buying illegally imported Chinese honey, including some that was adulterated with unauthorized antibiotics.

About one-third of honey sold in North America today is now True Source Certified. Many large grocery retailers and club stores only use certified honey for store brands, including Costco (Kirkland Signature) and Target (Market Pantry and Simply Balanced).

The U.S. imports more than 60% of the honey it needs from other countries. Most is from high-quality, legal sources. But some honey brokers and importers illegally circumvent tariffs and quality controls, selling honey to U.S. companies that is of questionable origin. This threatens the U.S. honey industry by undercutting fair market prices and damaging honey's reputation for quality and safety.

True Source Honey, LLC is an effort by a number of honey companies and importers to protect consumers and customers from illegally sourced honey; and to highlight and support legal, transparent and ethical sourcing. The initiative seeks to help maintain the reputation of honey as a high-quality, highly valued food and further sustain the U.S. honey sector. Visit www.TrueSourceHoney.com.
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Old 11-16-2013, 10:44 AM   #7
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Nice link/post Jack. I wish there was something as helpful as that for here......
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Old 09-03-2014, 03:06 AM   #8
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So if it has the true source certification, does that mean its good honey? Or can it still be crappy?


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Old 09-03-2014, 05:09 AM   #9
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agree with fatbloke.....I use affordable clover honey in 6 lb jugs, iirc, for many of my meads, as most of 'em have a whole LOT of something else going in them....when I occasionally make a mild plain mead, I'll spring big $$$ for locally grown honey - it's worth it, if honey is going to be THE flavor profile
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Old 09-03-2014, 10:02 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codyfree View Post
So if it has the true source certification, does that mean its good honey? Or can it still be crappy?


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There will always be some honey varieties that most people think are better than others. I'll take an orange blossom varietal over a "wildflower" honey anytime. The varietals are going to be better than "wildflower" (read: mystery) honey about 99% of the time.

That being said, there are some rather odd varietals out there: Peppermint, sage, radish, butterbean, manuka, etc...
There are some that are spicy, some that are more caramel-like, some are more earthy, I've heard the flavour of buckwheat honey described as a "barnyard" flavour; I thought it tasted like molasses & hay.

It's all honey, it'll all make mead. Some honeys are more desired than others & some honeys will make better mead than others; it's really up to you as to what you make & how good your end product will be. I tend to save generic honey like clover for melomels & use the varietals in mead. I like to let the varietals shine through on their own merits, plain old clover or alfalfa needs some help to shine.
Regards, GF.


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