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Old 10-25-2013, 07:29 PM   #1
OptimusJay
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Sep 2012
South Haven, Michigan
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Making a rye IPA Sunday with an OG around 1070. I will be using WLP001 that I harvested and washed from a previous brew back in May. I typically do starters with a stir plate and liquid yeast tubes. I am unclear of how to accurately so a starter and calculate the number of cells with the yeast a have from that brew back in may. I suppose I could just pitch what you see in the pic in lieu of a starter. Any suggestions?
Jay


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Old 10-25-2013, 08:01 PM   #2
Brewbien
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Jan 2013
Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OptimusJay View Post
Making a rye IPA Sunday with an OG around 1070. I will be using WLP001 that I harvested and washed from a previous brew back in May. I typically do starters with a stir plate and liquid yeast tubes. I am unclear of how to accurately so a starter and calculate the number of cells with the yeast a have from that brew back in may. I suppose I could just pitch what you see in the pic in lieu of a starter. Any suggestions?
Jay
According to the Mr. Malty pitching calculator, you would need about 1.1 liters of slurry for 5.25 gallons of 1.070 wort so I would say you definitely would want to make a starter and probably step it up.



 
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Old 10-29-2013, 03:26 PM   #3
hogwash
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Aug 2008
Waynesboro, VA
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Definitely make a starter, and it may take a little while for the yeast to "wake up." I have a starter going from rinsed yeast right now that didn't show any sign of fermentation for more than 24 hours. It's going along fine now but I was a little worried that it was dead.

 
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Old 10-29-2013, 05:36 PM   #4
Kmcogar
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Nov 2011
Honolulu, Hawaii
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I usually make a starter out of that much yeast. The I throw cold crash the yeast and throw it in the wort . Fermentation starts really fast.

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Old 10-29-2013, 11:39 PM   #5
Soldevi
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Dec 2011
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What did you end up doing?

 
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:24 AM   #6
OppamaBrendan
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Jun 2012
Oppama, 追浜, Kanagawa, 神奈川県
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I had about 100ml of washed yeast from a brew a month ago sitting in the fridge. S-05 strain. I made 500ml of DME wort for it split into two jars, and woke it up while I was brewing. By the time I was done chilling the yeast starter was bubbling away with a krausen! Way faster than I expected but I went with my original plan to leave the wort in the fermenter overnight and pitch in the morning. I only pitched half of the starter because the 2nd container maybe had a smell (not sure, was a washed, boiled, sanitized pickle jar but going to play it safe). My OG is 1.056 so not as stressfull for the yeast I assume.

 
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Old 11-01-2013, 05:40 AM   #7
DaveHunter5
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Oct 2012
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One wouldn't really need a starter for rinsed yeast if you pitch it day of or within a few days, but since it has been 5 months I would make a starter to check its viability. What did you end up doing Jay? I just rinsed by yeast after bottling and threw it into my APA fermenting now. My problem with rinsing yeast is I am always worried I am leaving a lot of yeast behind in the trub layer and so I am putting selective pressures on my yeast and not getting the full spectrum of flocculation and attenuation I would have if I used a new vial or smack pack every time. But $8 adds up with every batch so if I can rinse and reuse my yeast for as many batches as I can then that's savings in my pocket for more equipment.

 
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Old 11-01-2013, 10:56 PM   #8
brent77
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Jan 2011
los angeles, ca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveHunter5 View Post
One wouldn't really need a starter for rinsed yeast if you pitch it day of or within a few days, but since it has been 5 months I would make a starter to check its viability. What did you end up doing Jay? I just rinsed by yeast after bottling and threw it into my APA fermenting now. My problem with rinsing yeast is I am always worried I am leaving a lot of yeast behind in the trub layer and so I am putting selective pressures on my yeast and not getting the full spectrum of flocculation and attenuation I would have if I used a new vial or smack pack every time. But $8 adds up with every batch so if I can rinse and reuse my yeast for as many batches as I can then that's savings in my pocket for more equipment.
I've read that you should only reuse yeast a few times before they start mutating too far away from the original. Anyone had any distinct issues with this?

 
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Old 11-01-2013, 11:44 PM   #9
junior
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May 2011
Clifton, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OptimusJay View Post
Making a rye IPA Sunday with an OG around 1070. I will be using WLP001 that I harvested and washed from a previous brew back in May. I typically do starters with a stir plate and liquid yeast tubes. I am unclear of how to accurately so a starter and calculate the number of cells with the yeast a have from that brew back in may. I suppose I could just pitch what you see in the pic in lieu of a starter. Any suggestions?
Jay
Jay,
I have searched many of hours for an answer you have asked. with no definitive answer that I have found, this is what I do and have had good results. I make a 1liter starter from 50ml of rinsed 05 yeast , 24 hours later I step it up to 2liters,after 24 hours I put in fridge and leave for 4 days, decant, pitch into 5gallon batch of 1.060-1.070, usually takes off with in 2-5 hours. Don't know if this is over pitching because I tried to search to get an estimate of how many viable cells I could have in 50ml of rinsed yeast depending on age. The numbers were all over the place, so I continue to do what I stated above.
Hope this helps P.S. my rinsed yeast is usually 2-3 months old

 
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Old 11-02-2013, 04:13 AM   #10
DaveHunter5
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Oct 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brent77

I've read that you should only reuse yeast a few times before they start mutating too far away from the original. Anyone had any distinct issues with this?
One can probably get a healthy 5 generations. I've heard of people going up to 10 but that would definitely depend on your technique and how well you treat your little buddies. If you maintain slants or plates you can keep the same strain of yeast indefinitely. I know some breweries have been using the same yeast strain for hundreds of years.



 
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