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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Cold Side Process
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:54 PM   #1
traviswalken
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Default Cold Side Process

I am trying to settle on a cold side process. There are lots of different schools of thought (cold crash length, dry hop temp, dry hop time, etc.), but please let me know if you see any problems with my approach:

-Pitch starter per mrmalty.com
-Ferment 14 days +/- (temp controlled 64-68F typically)
-Cold Crash 3 days
-Warm up to about 60F
-Dry Hop 3-5 days
-Cold Crash 2 days
-Transfer to keg
-Carbonate

Thanks in advance for the feedback.
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:58 PM   #2
day_trippr
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You don't need to cold crash before dry hopping if you're going to cold crash afterwards. I dry hop most of my brews with free swimming pellets which get crashed to the bottom before racking to kegs, beer turns out nice and bright...

Cheers!
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Old 10-22-2013, 04:01 PM   #3
DSmith
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Quote:
Originally Posted by traviswalken View Post
I am trying to settle on a cold side process. There are lots of different schools of thought (cold crash length, dry hop temp, dry hop time, etc.), but please let me know if you see any problems with my approach:

-Pitch starter per mrmalty.com
-Ferment 14 days +/- (temp controlled 64-68F typically)
-Cold Crash 3 days
-Warm up to about 60F
-Dry Hop 3-5 days
-Cold Crash 2 days
-Transfer to keg
-Carbonate

Thanks in advance for the feedback.
I'm doing a similar process for dryhopped beers & bottling. The difference is clearing with gelatin during the first cold crash. I like gelatin for clarity, but for dryhopping in the primary, I've heard that I get better use of the dryhops by getting more yeast out of suspension with the gelatin.

My process would be:

-Pitch starter per mrmalty/yeastcalc
-Ferment to verified stable final gravity + a few days/weeks (temp controlled during active fermenation)
-Cold Crash 1 day, add gelatin, keep cold 3-5 days
-Warm up to about 60F
-Dry Hop 5 days
-Cold Crash 3-5 days
-Transfer to bottling bucket, boiled priming sugar, reyeast
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Old 10-22-2013, 04:37 PM   #4
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I agree 2 cold-crash steps seems like overkill. I also dry-hop in the keg; any reason you couldn't cold-crash and dry hop at the same time before packaging?

Lastly, if you are using temp control, no reason to have a a set number of fermentation days.....it you are at FG, you are ready to go to the next step...I typically will cold crash (and even keg) 8-12 days after brewing.

Hope this helps!
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Old 10-22-2013, 06:53 PM   #5
traviswalken
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Thanks for the responses.

As Dsmith suggests, I cold crash to drop out some of the yeast before dry hopping. I think most people dry hop without the cold crash. The first cold crash is probably unneccesary...but it is very easy with a temp controlled freezer. I have heard that Firestone dry hops toward the end of fermentation...so they don't wory about some yeast in the beer during dry hopping.

I think I might try gelatin prior to dry hop next time. Seems like an inexpensive simple solution to clearing beer...although a week or two near freezing seems to work well.

I dry hopped in the keg on my last batch. I liked the hop aroma, but didn't like how long it took to clear. I was picking hop debris out of my teeth for about a week. I also don't like having to pull the bag out of the keg after a couple weeks. This is especially frustrating because I can't seem to get my kegs to seal if I do the dental floss trick. Therefore, I am pulling the bag out with bbq tongs. Hopefully I get good hop aroma without the bag in the serving keg. If not, I can always add it later.
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Old 10-22-2013, 07:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by traviswalken View Post
Thanks for the responses.

As Dsmith suggests, I cold crash to drop out some of the yeast before dry hopping. I think most people dry hop without the cold crash. The first cold crash is probably unneccesary...but it is very easy with a temp controlled freezer. I have heard that Firestone dry hops toward the end of fermentation...so they don't wory about some yeast in the beer during dry hopping.

I think I might try gelatin prior to dry hop next time. Seems like an inexpensive simple solution to clearing beer...although a week or two near freezing seems to work well.

I dry hopped in the keg on my last batch. I liked the hop aroma, but didn't like how long it took to clear. I was picking hop debris out of my teeth for about a week. I also don't like having to pull the bag out of the keg after a couple weeks. This is especially frustrating because I can't seem to get my kegs to seal if I do the dental floss trick. Therefore, I am pulling the bag out with bbq tongs. Hopefully I get good hop aroma without the bag in the serving keg. If not, I can always add it later.
The gelatin makes very clear beer if you're not dryhopping. Here is a Rye IPA that was cold crashed, gelatin for 5 days cold, room temperature dryhop, cold crash, bottled. Clarity is not the goal with an IPA, effective use of the dryhops is and I think this procedure works pretty good by sealing the yeast under a layer of settled gelatin prior to dryhopping.

I wish I had more of this beer, it was a favorite.

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