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Old 11-06-2007, 08:41 PM   #21
FlyingHorse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faber
I have a friend, the guy who taught me how to brew, who has an abundance of kegs. He has a deal with about a dozen other friends that, if they buy their own CO2, he will happily hook them up with full kegs. They pitch in by buying him sacks of barley, new brewing toys, more kegs, etc., every now and then. He's got quite the home brewery now. No one's keping track, but everyone is pretty happy with the arrangement.

Everyone is of course grateful, and they try to clean his kegs when they bring them back. (Of course, he scolds them for doing so--he wants to know everything that goes in those things.) His wife is just happy that there is now more than one place for us to drink homebrew and watch the/a game and that his hobby is self-sufficient, or very near it.

I think that is probably about as "enterprising" as a homebrewer can get legally.
I doubt there's anything "legal" about that arrangement. In the eyes of the law, your friend is selling beer. The fact that the currency is bartered ingredients and equipment rather than greenbacks is meaningless.

Will anyone go after him? Probably not (but he'd better keep those 12 friends happy )

If they did, could they convict? Again, probably not without one of the friends' help. Or maybe the text of your post, since you've more or less ID'd him and laid out his whole operation.

I wouldn't risk it, though.


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Old 11-06-2007, 08:43 PM   #22
cheezydemon
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Was that the answer you wanted?Lol. You also can't live in a dry county. Otherwise you have to have a brick&mortar in a wet county to do business from, and you still can't brew in your basement and sell from your place of business.


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Old 11-06-2007, 11:30 PM   #23
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Let me spell this out for you: follow the money.

1) exicse tax rates are high
2) governments really, really like taxes
3) governments heavily regulate selling alcohol to make sure that you pay your taxes
4) if you skirt the regulations, you don't pay taxes. that makes government mad. see #2

Don't try to sell beer, unless you talk to your local government and take care of things to their satisfaction. Homebrewers nation wide will appriciate it.

 
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Old 11-07-2007, 12:17 AM   #24
faber
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bike N Brew
I doubt there's anything "legal" about that arrangement. In the eyes of the law, your friend is selling beer. The fact that the currency is bartered ingredients and equipment rather than greenbacks is meaningless.

Will anyone go after him? Probably not (but he'd better keep those 12 friends happy )

If they did, could they convict? Again, probably not without one of the friends' help. Or maybe the text of your post, since you've more or less ID'd him and laid out his whole operation.

I wouldn't risk it, though.
It's never a one-for-one exchange. He has never asked for anything, nor has he ever denied anyone a keg becasue they didn't chip in for the last sack of barley. He doesn't keep track of who contributed what. Hell, he doesn't even know. But when it's time to hang out, talk smack, watch a game, whatever, he knows a keg of one of his will be there.

Surely a good prosecutor could make something of it, but he wouldn't be from this part of the country.

But in case he doesn't know (his son is an L3), I'll share what this thread has generated. Thanks to all.

You know a lot of us are reading this and thinking, "Hmmm......" What homebrewer hasn't thought of going pro?

Cheers, gents

 
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Old 11-07-2007, 01:28 AM   #25
trainfever
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I read somewhere that as homebrewers, we are not allowed to sell our beer and we are only allowed to brew 200 gallons a year. Thats a lot of beer for one person to drink. I guess they figured we wouldnt be drinking it alone.
I also read that it was President Jimmy Carter who legalized home brewing back in 1978. I always liked him, we share the same birthday.


 
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Old 11-07-2007, 01:46 AM   #26
Yooper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trainfever
I read somewhere that as homebrewers, we are not allowed to sell our beer and we are only allowed to brew 200 gallons a year. Thats a lot of beer for one person to drink. I guess they figured we wouldnt be drinking it alone.
It's 100 gallons per legal adult, up to 200 gallons per household, per year. Not 200 each.
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Old 11-07-2007, 02:28 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbow
Hi,

We have done a few all grain brews now with quite a bit of success and are now wondering about selling it at the local farmers market. What do we need to do? Does anyone sell on a small scale? Do you have to set up as a business and will this cost a lot?

Thanks
Federal regulations require that if you are going to make beer for sale, you must file with the federal government to become a brewery. and all your brewing has to be done on commercial property (they won't allow you to make it at home).
after i learned that, i stopped looking into it. Then there is the taxes that have to be done. Lets not forget the bond that is required by the government that you have to pay in the process of getting your brewing license (10% up front of your estimated yearly tax revenue).
And all that is only federal. on top of that you would have to check your state's regulations and abide by them as well.


 
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Old 11-07-2007, 10:44 AM   #28
agentgonzo
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A trick that a friend used a while ago was to set a keg up on the counter of a local pub (with the landlord's permission of course) and give it away for free. Anyone could go up and help themselves. Then he just put a collection pot next to it. Can't remember how much he made for the barrel and not sure that would work out at a farmer's market.

 
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Old 11-07-2007, 03:07 PM   #29
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in new york I think the law is giving away a six pack per person per year is the limit

 
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Old 11-07-2007, 03:52 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdWort
You don't want the BTAF kickin your doors in, taking your beer and hauling you off in handcuffs.
...unless you're into that kind of thing...


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