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Old 12-23-2012, 07:42 PM   #841
skullface1818
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Jan 2012
tallahssee, fl
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Makes sense, tho with my long starters (I generally wait for about 3 days before I start my brew day) fermentation starts in a matter of hours, about 7-12 to be exact.

but I know to not freak out unless its been 2-3 days, depending on yeast

 
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Old 12-27-2012, 08:42 PM   #842
richfei
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Dec 2012
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I started my first 5 gallon extract a few days ago. Making a hefeweizen and used WLP300 with the expectation of an active fermentation. Nothing happened in the first 24 hours, then came a little bubbling in the airlock. 12 hours after that, massive krausen, overactive airlock and some overflow. Glad I came across this thread and waited patiently

 
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Old 01-04-2013, 05:04 AM   #843
InfectedBrewing
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Dec 2012
Tampa, Florida
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Yes, I started brewing a chocolate milk stout and I made a blow off. It was really active during that time but once its stopped overflowing I put the airlock on and very little activity . I was worried, but I'm glad to have ran into this thread. Thanks guys!

 
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:34 PM   #844
DallasHomeBrew2
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Jan 2013
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Can the beer be harmed by leaving it in the keg too long after fermentation has stopped? The kit says to ferment for 7-14 days, and everyone here recommends at least 3, maybe 4 weeks. If the fermentation has appeared to have stopped after 16 days and I left it in the keg for a full 21 days, could the batch go south? Or is it better to be safe than sorry? Thanks.

 
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:50 PM   #845
KNOTSANE
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Dec 2009
New Orleans, Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DallasHomeBrew2
Can the beer be harmed by leaving it in the keg too long after fermentation has stopped? The kit says to ferment for 7-14 days, and everyone here recommends at least 3, maybe 4 weeks. If the fermentation has appeared to have stopped after 16 days and I left it in the keg for a full 21 days, could the batch go south? Or is it better to be safe than sorry? Thanks.
Your fine. Just check your gravity to be sure ferm is complete. Let it sit for 2 weeks or so and let the yeast finish up their thing and clean it up. Think if it as a secondary without transferring your beer to another vessel.
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Old 01-10-2013, 10:38 AM   #846
dannylerch
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Jan 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallashomebrew2 View Post
can the beer be harmed by leaving it in the keg too long after fermentation has stopped? The kit says to ferment for 7-14 days, and everyone here recommends at least 3, maybe 4 weeks. If the fermentation has appeared to have stopped after 16 days and i left it in the keg for a full 21 days, could the batch go south? Or is it better to be safe than sorry? Thanks.
rdwhah

 
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Old 01-10-2013, 06:05 PM   #847
bleme
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Jan 2012
Visalia, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DallasHomeBrew2
Can the beer be harmed by leaving it in the keg too long after fermentation has stopped? The kit says to ferment for 7-14 days, and everyone here recommends at least 3, maybe 4 weeks. If the fermentation has appeared to have stopped after 16 days and I left it in the keg for a full 21 days, could the batch go south? Or is it better to be safe than sorry? Thanks.
The longest I have gone in primary is 6 weeks but I usually aim for 3. Either way, the beer turns out great. I think kits tend to recommend shorter ferm periods because they know that people have no patience and it turns them over faster, this they sell more kits.

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Old 01-10-2013, 06:20 PM   #848
dannylerch
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Jan 2013
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bleme, I think you nailed it on the head. I think they also recommend a secondary because most non beer enthusiasts probably feel icky seeing a little rice cake in their brew.

 
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Old 01-11-2013, 01:57 AM   #849
Ogri
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Sep 2011
Osaka, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dannylerch View Post
bleme, I think you nailed it on the head. I think they also recommend a secondary because most non beer enthusiasts probably feel icky seeing a little rice cake in their brew.
Well, that and someone, somewhere, along the line can make some more cash on a carboy for doing secondary in.

 
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Old 01-11-2013, 04:32 PM   #850
jerrodm
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Sep 2012
Silver Spring, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogri View Post
Well, that and someone, somewhere, along the line can make some more cash on a carboy for doing secondary in.
I'm not sure it's really anything as sinister as that. More likely, it's just inertia--from what I gather, up until four or five years ago racking to a secondary was standard practice for almost all homebrewers, and was recommended by Papazian, Palmer and others. There are numerous threads about this so there's no need to rehash the whole thing but, suffice it to say, over time the weight of opinion among many HBers has shifted to a long primary/no secondary schedule. I suspect that HB shops simply haven't changed their standard advised protocols because it hasn't been THAT long since a secondary was considered de rigeur.

I myself still secondary most beers because I get better clarity that way (and because that's the way I've done it for almost a decade!), but I know I'm probably in the minority at this point. At any rate, I don't think the secondary instruction is some nefarious plot by LHBS's...it's just an artifact from a time when standard practices were different.
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