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Old 02-23-2014, 01:39 PM   #161
wilserbrewer
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Perhaps I'm mistaken, but I thought that with the copper tubing to cool the tower, both ends of the tubing are to be left open with enough gap to provide airflow into the tower.

I thought that the copper not only cools the tower, but also causes the cold air to drop out of the copper tube thusly creating passive air circulation to the tower.


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Old 02-27-2014, 11:15 AM   #162
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Thank you guys for the feedback... all you guys seem to be on the side of the fence I want to get to (the low foam/greener side), so please don't take the following as any sort of argument or disrespect, because I appreciate any knowledge being shared with me... I just want to understand... and also I'm sorry for the length of this post...

I'm definitely going to get myself some more beer line, which previously I was against, because I think MAYBE I now understand. Please tell me if my thought process makes sense....

... In attempting to "balance" my system, since I read this is basically the first thing I should do to ever expect good beer, all tables and charts mentioning length, let's use this one for example:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f84/beer...culator-35369/

urge me to go shorter as the temperature drops. I've been using the temperature inside my kegerator, which was incorrect, as I should have been using the one inside my beer tower? though this table does not go to the 58 degrees i am now at in my tower, I can see that if the pattern continues, 60 to 70 degrees would indeed require about 10' of line. So is this the reason 10' is suggested, because it's balancing the system for us "hot tower" guys?

If that logic was sound, then would the system then not be out of balance, after the first half pint because then the beer would be at the 33 degrees of the kegerator. Again, I still don't understand the tables that well to know the impact, but it would seem to me that the beer would now be over carbonated at this point? I'm making this assumption off Beer absorbing CO2 better when it's cold, and now the pressure is higher to get the beer through all that line.

Either way I still am going to get the longer beer line, but IF I am able to wrap my head around what's going on, this baby might one day be able to feed himself....

That being said, I still want to cool my tower. I understand the idea of all the warm contact winning over the cold, however that was my reasoning for the insulation and the filling of the void at the top. If there was no room for warm air, and no contact with warm surfaces, other than the faucet (which I would hope wouldn't have too big an impact, because I can't change that variable), the copper would conduct the cold up, and the insulation would protect it from any warmth.... with the only limiting factor on the cooling being copper's physical ability to conduct temperature.

For now I want to avoid a fan because honestly getting that wired, built, etc is just entering a whole new area of ignorance for me, even though I agree with you guys 100% that this is a sure way to achieve the result I desire. I thank you for those tips, and will keep them as a future option.

Brad however was able to get the result I want, by doing what I feel is pretty much the same thing I did, I just don't understand how we got different results (This is assuming his "1C" means one degree). His spray foam filled the tower too preventing any air circulation, and he also filled the top void of the tower.

Thank you guys again, and I can't wait to see how the beer line helps.



 
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Old 03-03-2014, 02:52 AM   #163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lukebeulah View Post
The issue is the line length. You should be running at about 12psi on your CO2 to keep your beer carbed properly. To do this you need to be running lines at around 10 feet. Once you do it, you will know why people always have this response to "foamy beer that is not overcarbed"


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Luke, Purplehaze & Homebrewforsure... Thank you guys!!!

I thrilled to say that I'm a survivor. I've been battling foam for 5 long years, and after a risky kegerator transplant, a double perlick tap bypass and twin copper stints, you three gave me the gift of a perfect pour!

Even though so much is known about this terrible condition, and it affects so many of us, so many foamy beers still find their way to under privileged home bars across the world, which is why I pledge my efforts to share my new found understanding of this disease with all who will listen.

Please don't think of me as a hero, I'm just an ordinary man... however my yellow "Pour Strong" bracelets and posters of my perfect pours are available for sale in the lobby.... and there may or may not be a character based on me in the upcoming Incredibles 2.

I owe all of my pour-glory, "poury" if you will, to this forum and fellow drinkers like yourselves... Thank you! and Cheers!

 
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:36 PM   #164
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Apr 2014
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Thanks for all the help on here. First time user on here. I want to use the copper pipe idea as well. I was originally going to drill a 2" hole for my tower, but should be able to make it just large enough for the one copper pipe for a single line correct? Which is better for me as it's a thick piece of metal to drill through. Or would a larger hole help to get more cold air up there? I saw an earlier post where the guy used spray foam to seal off any gaps. Thanks!


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Old 01-18-2016, 05:12 AM   #165
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Lots of good info, going to try this soon!

 
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Old 05-26-2016, 12:46 PM   #166
Beer4U
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Jul 2009
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I love this idea, and I am in the process of installing right now, but I have a question.

Is there an easy way to change the beer lines with this setup? It seems like you would have to remove the tower, faucets, hose clamps, copper pipes, etc. For me, installing the lines took quite a bit of time (mostly spent wrestling with the inserting the beer lines into the shanks and clamping).

Has anyone had to change their lines with this setup yet? If so, any insight would be helpful.

 
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Old 06-04-2016, 05:06 PM   #167
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Hi - sorry if this seems unrelated, but I am doing a wine cooler conversion and have added copper pipes for cooling the lines and it seems to be working well on a test run (kegerator filled with cases of water). My copper into the tower runs up to about 1/2" below the shank, since I was trying to leave room for the stepdown clamp. However, in reading through this post, I see several people that are not using clamps (see posts 136 and 139 as examples). So do you need the clamps, or not? If not, I can extend my copper about 3/4 inch to be up over the shank, which some posters have said is preferable. I'm hoping to solder pipes today! Thanks!

Edit: the attached picture is from post 139 - it's not my setup. I will post pics on a build thread later.
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Old 06-06-2016, 08:41 PM   #168
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Hi Beermati,

I think you may be over-thinking this. The copper is used as a radiator to conduct heat away from the beer lines down into the cold box, where it is dissipated just like any other heat (eg from a room-temp keg). You don't need the copper to go all the way to the end, you don't need to solder anything, and you don't need clamps! As in the photo you re-posted, close is good enough.

Scott (or31acres)

 
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Old 06-06-2016, 10:52 PM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beermati View Post
However, in reading through this post, I see several people that are not using clamps
Quote:
Originally Posted by or31acres View Post
Hi Beermati,

you don't need clamps!
I think you miss understood his question with regards to clamps or31acres... he's asking if he needs clamp on the beer hose that is over the hose barb for the shank.

With that said, beermati, USE clamps on your beer line. The extra little bit of copper is not worth the potential leak and fail point between the hose and hosebarb on the shank by not using clamps.

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Old 06-06-2016, 10:59 PM   #170
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Well, in a balanced system, the pressure should be near 0 at the faucet. But when it's closed, the pressure goes up, I think I would feel better with a clamp.


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