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Old 09-10-2013, 01:45 AM   #11
kingwood-kid
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Jul 2008
houston
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Your water looks better than mine, unless you're making a stout. I'd just use it as is, and have some pH strips and acid around if you need to adjust your pH. Maybe use RO water to sparge. If you want a maltier beer, I would just use more malt and leave out the cane sugar. Another option is to switch out the pilsner for Vienna, MO or something mixed with Munich. Will it lean towards porter/stout and away from Quad? Sure. But that's only a problem if you're entering certain types of competitions.
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Old 09-10-2013, 12:33 PM   #12
JR_Brewer
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Jul 2012
Washington, DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNGabe View Post
Funny you should post this. I've been re-reading 'Yeast' by Chris White and just got through the section on wort composition.

"One thing many brewers have been led to believe is that higher mash temperatures result in "maltier" beers, By this they mean that the beer has more malt sweetness. Higher mash temperatures do not develop more malt character or flavor, nor does it really result in much sweetness. The long-chain dextrins created at high mash temperatures are at most only very slightly sweet." p70

So a higher temp may give a less fermentable wort and definitely more long chain sugars, but the perceived sweetness (and maltiness) of the beer is dependant on a number of other factors.
Seems like another example of experts disagreeing. Brewers have been led to believe this by John Palmer, BYO Magazine, and most of the common literature out there. I guess I'm in no position to say whether Dr. White is right or wrong, but I know when I brew, I tend to mash bigger, richer beers (such as a Belgian Dark) in the mid-150's.

So, back to the original recipe critique requested by WarblyTremolo, I would mash this in the mid-150's, but that's just like, my opinion, man.

Best of luck!
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Old 11-17-2013, 05:32 PM   #13
WarblyTremolo
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Dec 2011
Chicago, IL
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Quick update on this one. Final recipe went as follows:

13# Dingemans Pilsen
1# Malted White Wheat
1# Special B
1# D-90 (15 min, boil)
1# D-45 (15 min, boil)

Mashed at 148 to get a highly fermentable wort.

1 oz Saaz, 3.2%AA @ 90 min
1 oz Tettnang, 3.9%AA @ 60 min

1 tsp Calcium Chloride in mash

I began a 2L starter of Wyeast 3787, let it ferment out and settle, decanted the spent beer and added another 2L of fresh wort for a nice big starter. 1# D-90 Added to fermenter at high krausen

I reached an OG of 1.090 and as of racking had it down to 1.010. The flavor out of primary was of plums and raisins, nice and malty with warming alcohol. It's spending 90 days in secondary before I bottle it. Really happy with this one - should be fantastic once the chicago winter truly sets in!

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Old 11-20-2013, 08:18 PM   #14
ArkotRamathorn
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May 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_Brewer View Post
Seems like another example of experts disagreeing. Brewers have been led to believe this by John Palmer, BYO Magazine, and most of the common literature out there. I guess I'm in no position to say whether Dr. White is right or wrong, but I know when I brew, I tend to mash bigger, richer beers (such as a Belgian Dark) in the mid-150's.

So, back to the original recipe critique requested by WarblyTremolo, I would mash this in the mid-150's, but that's just like, my opinion, man.

Best of luck!
I think it all boils down to (get it) regular and super tasters. I'd be willing to put money down that one dude will drink the same grain bill mashed at different temps and say "the one mashed higher is sweeter" and another dude "they're both about the same flavor profile" and both could very well be judges for BCJP. When my SWMBO smells moist garbage coming from the fermenter, I smell lemon peel .

Will be watching though, update with pictures if you can, I want to do a BSDA soonish.

 
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Old 04-22-2014, 06:43 PM   #15
golf4collet
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Dec 2009
WV
Posts: 1

Is there an update on how this turned out? I'm getting ready to do a Belgian Dark Strong and am curious about how your recipe turned out.

 
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