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Old 09-13-2013, 11:02 PM   #21
eastoak
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Jan 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reuliss View Post
+1. Repitching yeast is asking for trouble, and if you're already having an infection problem, that repitching would be the last thing I do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicegirl View Post
I have read through your entire thread and it would appear that your problem is stemming from the reuse of your yeast. I would toss out all of your current yeast and start over with fresh.
I have heard of this problem and most of the time it is caused by the washing and reuse of some types of yeast.
As for myself, I always use fresh yeast, just for this very reason and have never experienced an infection problem.
I also always mill my grain either outside or in the garage in the colder weather, far away from where I'm actually brewing. As a small tip, if you haven't used your grain mill in awhile always run about 1/4 to 1/2 pound of grain through it and then toss this grain out. It cleans the rollers of anything that may have gathered there and insures that any crud will not end up in your mash.
while repitching contaminated yeast is not wise, reusing yeast is a time honored practice in brewing.

 
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Old 09-13-2013, 11:10 PM   #22
eastoak
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Jan 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicegirl View Post
I have read through your entire thread and it would appear that your problem is stemming from the reuse of your yeast. I would toss out all of your current yeast and start over with fresh.
I have heard of this problem and most of the time it is caused by the washing and reuse of some types of yeast.
As for myself, I always use fresh yeast, just for this very reason and have never experienced an infection problem.
outside of the first couple of newbie batches i've never experienced an either and i reuse yeast all the time. you have good sanitation practices so you are able to stay ahead of the problem, "new" or reused yeast is not really the issue.

 
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Old 09-14-2013, 04:42 AM   #23
AT-JeffT
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Nov 2012
Elmhurst, IL/ Cedar Falls, IA
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Lets get this thread back on track: Sanitation was my issue. Reusing yeast made my sanitation issue harder to pin point. The only debatable issue with reusing yeast is sanitation. A starter is a form of yeast reuse. White labs and wyeast grow the yeast you use from cultures for every package.

Today I purchased some 1gal paint filters from home depot. These will be used strictly for cold side filtering. They will never see grain. They seem like they will fit perfectly over an auto siphon. For a few dollars I would highly recommend them to anyone.

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Old 09-14-2013, 03:29 PM   #24
prohl84
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Jan 2013
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I am glad it appears you have figured it out- I agree the grain bag is most likely the source of contamination.

Thanks to the negative results of your swab analysis I will not discard/ re-purpose any of my 'contaminated' equipment. Because of how seriously people take contamination of their equipment (I am one) and how often I've read about retiring old, dubious, or infected fermenters. Or even for those thinking about doubling up on equipment to make sours. I feel like this thread is sticky worthy. Put a tag on the title "save your $ do not throw away your buckets!"

IMHO your efforts have hammered a nail or two in the "bugs vs. brewery cleaners" debate coffin.
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Old 09-28-2013, 06:08 AM   #25
AT-JeffT
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Update:
It has been a few months in the bottles for a beer that was bottled with a boiled bag. No signs of infection. It appears that the grain bag as filter was the definitive cause. Like 99% of all homebrew infections mine was caused by an item not getting properly cleaned before contact with wort/beer on the cold side.

Hopefully others can learn from my endeavor and avoid using bags that have seen grain as siphon filters.

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Old 09-30-2013, 04:12 PM   #26
Nicegirl
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May 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AT-JeffT View Post
Update:
It has been a few months in the bottles for a beer that was bottled with a boiled bag. No signs of infection. It appears that the grain bag as filter was the definitive cause. Like 99% of all homebrew infections mine was caused by an item not getting properly cleaned before contact with wort/beer on the cold side.

Hopefully others can learn from my endeavor and avoid using bags that have seen grain as siphon filters.
I'm so glad you finally found the problem. Nothing worse than going though the time and expense to brew up a great beer just to have it trashed by a infection.
Take note fellow brewers...everything, without exception, that comes in contact with the wort after cooling MUST be throughly sanitized. Thanks for sharing something we all need to look out for.
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Old 09-30-2013, 10:45 PM   #27
Trail
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I think we all appreciate the effort you've gone to in order to identify and document the cause of this. It's stuff like this that helps us get away from the witchcraft that is traditional thinking, and on to brewing great beers!
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Old 12-31-2013, 01:49 AM   #28
AT-JeffT
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UPDATE:
I've brewed tons of new styles I haven't brewed before and all have come out great. However, I brewed the recipe I've been having issues with and had the same issues. Tasted great going into the bottle then infection-like flavors showed up 2 days after it was fully carbonated. To clarify, it tasted fine at different points before it was fully carbonated. It went from fine to bad in 2 days.

I did some research on the wyeast equivalent of WLP002 (WY1968) and found these articles:
this article and this HBT thread.

Both talk about a cider / mild infection off flavor that appears after bottling.

I believe that my 'infections' were just an odd issue with WLP002/1698. It develops cidery flavors when bottle conditioned and tends to attenuate further in the bottle. (due to its incredible flocculation)

I have the problem recipe fermenting and to be kegged in 5 days. I'll be posting back here to report if the issue has been solved.

 
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Old 12-31-2013, 02:29 AM   #29
eastoak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AT-JeffT View Post
UPDATE:
I've brewed tons of new styles I haven't brewed before and all have come out great. However, I brewed the recipe I've been having issues with and had the same issues. Tasted great going into the bottle then infection-like flavors showed up 2 days after it was fully carbonated. To clarify, it tasted fine at different points before it was fully carbonated. It went from fine to bad in 2 days.

I did some research on the wyeast equivalent of WLP002 (WY1968) and found these articles:
this article and this HBT thread.

Both talk about a cider / mild infection off flavor that appears after bottling.

I believe that my 'infections' were just an odd issue with WLP002/1698. It develops cidery flavors when bottle conditioned and tends to attenuate further in the bottle. (due to its incredible flocculation)

I have the problem recipe fermenting and to be kegged in 5 days. I'll be posting back here to report if the issue has been solved.
will this be the first time you keg? i liked my beer much better after i started kegging, it just seemed to stay fresher for longer. this could just be a perception but i stuck with kegs anyway, no more bottling (except for sours).

 
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Old 12-31-2013, 03:42 AM   #30
AT-JeffT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastoak View Post
will this be the first time you keg? i liked my beer much better after i started kegging, it just seemed to stay fresher for longer. this could just be a perception but i stuck with kegs anyway, no more bottling (except for sours).
No, been kegging for quite a while now. I don't have a preference either way. I would assume it does stay fresh longer as it is stored cold. I was/am dead set on figuring out my bottling issues though. I do believe it is the WLP002/1968 that is the issue. I've bottled other stuff since and its been fine. Most recently, a Kolsch which is the lowest IBU beer I've made and it turned out great out of the bottle.

 
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