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Old 09-27-2013, 04:34 PM   #11
loveofrose
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Originally Posted by WVMJ View Post
You are seeming to favor light honeys, how would this work with a dark honey, you guys in TX have some nice dark honeys to try this on. Is this bubbly or flat? Does it taste like beer? One of my mentors makes his meads beer style, petulent in beer bottles. He shared a 14 year old bottle with us, starting to turn a little sherry like but so good and smooth, if you bought a sherry that tasted like this you would be happy. Who is Bray in case we need to write a drinking song about him for sharing his mead with us. WVMJ
Now that the protocol is worked out, the next test is multiple varietal honeys. Soon, I will start tupelo, palmetto, and another OB varietal version of this. All will be posted at gotmead. I know only palmetto is a little dark, but it ain't buckwheat! My thought process is that lighter honey has less nutrient. If this protocol works for light honey, then dark honey should work as well...In theory.

It is flat, but could easily be bubbly if you primed at bottling.
It does not in any way taste like beer. Tasting notes are posted at gotmead under Belgian Ale Yeast Experiment.

Bray is my name. I have a doctorate in microbiology, hence the interest in screening all these yeast. Love of Rose is my rock band's name!
If you want music for the song, just let me know!


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Old 09-28-2013, 12:59 AM   #12
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Beakers swirling, test tubes bubbling, freezers full of yeast, playing with petri dishes full of wine yeast when you are supposed to be working Do you have the purple Dexters lab gloves! Professionally, do you think about that staggered yeast nutrient addition is the most important step in creating a young mead that is drinkable? Do the yeast really know when the 1/3 break is depending on what the starting gravity is or do you think its really fixed for each strain of yeast so that what we call the break is really just an arbitrary number, but one that is close enough for govt work? WVMJ


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Old 09-28-2013, 12:16 PM   #13
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Ha ha. Unfortunately, there is no mead making in cancer research although we do have the purple gloves!

The most important part of making a good, young mead is keeping the yeast happy. While that includes SNAs, pH (buffering swings and degassing since CO2 is acidic) and temperature also play a huge role. These things have different levels of importance depending on your strain of yeast (genetic component). I screened to find a yeast that cared less about these variables, then gave it a cushy environment so that there is no bitching from the yeast.

Sugar breaks are just something we use to guesstimate an addition time. In reality, yeast just sense for a nutrient and figure out a yes no answer. If they answer is no, they go into damage control and make off flavors. Since we are adding nutrients a little at a time, it creates a nice slow burn such that the yeast never run out of what they need. Not the case in up front addition. The caveat is that SNAs is not enough. If the temperture swings too hIgh, yeast angry. If the pH is too low through fermentation or dissolved CO2, yeast angry. We try to balance all these variables. A forgiving yeast helps make this balance easier and reproducable. Think of Wyeast 1388 as the happy go lucking guy at a party that never complains unless you try to piss him off!
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Old 09-29-2013, 08:40 PM   #14
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Seems to me that this would work

1 Gallon of OB honey
4 Gallons of water
4 Oranges
1 cup Grape nuts wort or 100 Raisins
1 package of Bread yeast

No heat method

Pour honey and water into one plastic buck then stir. Next pour into a second bucket, then back into the first. Repeat this process five times to aerate the must.

Peel the oranges and slice each into fourths. Put in must. Add Raisins or grape nuts wort to must. Pitch yeast and ferment for a week. Siphon the must to a secondary each week. That is equal to four transfers in the month. Trying to get clearity by keeping the must off of the yeast cake as much as possible

I think the trick here is to make a dry mead. Too much honey means too sweet and a longer cure time.
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:31 PM   #15
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I've started testing for different types of varietal honeys using this protocol.
If anyone is interested, it is/will be all posted at the gotmead forums.
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Old 10-08-2013, 09:12 PM   #16
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I searched for "bray's" over there with no luck. Would you mind posting a more detailed recipe that a noob could follow, or a link to one?

I assume the 1:2DAP part is a starter, but do not understand the breaks. I'd like to try this but need detailed instructions.
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Old 10-08-2013, 11:44 PM   #17
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Hi Edbert! No problem. I assume you want to try a one gallon batch.
Sanitation is also assumed.

The BOMM - 1 gallon
Get a one gallon jug of spring water - I use Ozarka - make sure it is not distilled!
Remove 1/2 cup water to compensate for Wyeast 1388 smack pack volume.*
Draw line on jug at current water level.
Remove 3.2 cups of water from 1 gallon jug. (757 ml)
Add Orange blossom honey back to the line. About 2.4 lbs.*SG will be 1.092-1.1.
Add 1/6 tsp potassium carbonate (Not calcium carbonate!)
Add 1/4 tsp Diammonium Phospate (DAP) and 1/2 tsp of Fermaid K.*
-the DAP and Fermaid K will also be added again at 2/3 and 1/3 sugar break.
Example: If SG is 1.099, You would add again at 1.066 and 1.033.
Cap and shake until all honey is dissolved - it will take a bit of effort!
Add activated Wyeast 1388 yeast.*Activated for about 2 hours to overnight.
Be sure to squeeze every drop out!
Shake once a day to aerate for the first week. No water in airlock for 7 days.
Don't forget to monitor the gravity with a hydrometer so that you know when to add the nutrients!

Let me know if you have any other questions!
Also, you have to register for an account at gotmead. Doesn't cost anything and is a wealth of info!
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Old 10-09-2013, 03:48 PM   #18
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Awesome...hitting AHS on my way home.

No water in airlock and multiple hydromter readings...is contamination not as much of a problem here as it is with beer?
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Old 10-09-2013, 05:14 PM   #19
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Honey is pretty difficult to contaminate. You would have to do something really stupid to contaminate a batch of mead which differs greatly from beer. For gravity readings, I just sterilize the hydrometer and put it in the 1 gallon jugs! Simple and no waste!

Based on very reproducable yeast kinetics, you could probably add nutrients at 2 and 5 days after pitching and be really close to the correct sugar breaks.
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Old 10-10-2013, 02:17 AM   #20
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All done, I admit I am excited. 1/6th of a tsp was tough to guess at, my smallest measure was 1/4, I am close for sure but not exact, hope there's wiggle room.

Just out of curiosity, why no water in the airlock?

Also, my Fermaid K contains DAP, any chance of having too much DAP?

Not much headpsace, I used a 1Gal carboy not the Ozarka bottle, any chance of eruption?

Last question for tonight...use a dark place to ferment like beer, and does temperature matter?


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