Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > Advanced extract brewing
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Old 08-11-2013, 04:10 AM   #21
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How many of you pour your extract and stir it in the kettle ? Here is a great item that make life a lot more easy. Not to mention better beer. Why? Better mixing in of the extract. What I do is mix the extract in a separate container then mix it in the kettle. This mixer is called a jiffy mixer. It's 100% stainless steel. Don't use plastic or galvanized paint mixers as they can be toxic. I also sanitize this and use it to whirlpool my wort when chilling.



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Old 08-11-2013, 04:55 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by BxBrewer View Post
How many of you pour your extract and stir it in the kettle ? Here is a great item that make life a lot more easy. Not to mention better beer. Why? Better mixing in of the extract. What I do is mix the extract in a separate container then mix it in the kettle. This mixer is called a jiffy mixer. It's 100% stainless steel. Don't use plastic or galvanized paint mixers as they can be toxic. I also sanitize this and use it to whirlpool my wort when chilling.

I've been meaning to get a mixer for my drill just like this.

I brew extract largely and have been working on my all grain game but I definitely agree that there are ways to improve the extract brewing process. I also definitely believe that extracts can make great beers!

Points to note are getting good hot and cold breaks with rolling boils and quick cooling. I also place a lot of emphasis on my malt additions. For a while now I've been utilizing late malt extract additions to get my colors right, avoiding scorching (I still turn off my burner when I add extract) and preserving flavors. I also have been liking the differences in hop utilization when using late extract additions.

I also use starters, rehydrate yeast when using dry packets, steep specialty grains and keep extra malt extract around to make sure I'm hitting my gravity.


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Old 08-11-2013, 05:21 AM   #23
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I've been brewing less than six months and have 6 brews under my belt so far, the seventh will be tomorrow. I like using LME for the bulk of my fermentables and supplementing the rest with either steeping grain or a partial mash. So far all my beers have come out really well. Late extract editions, controlling fermentation temps and quality ingredients have really paid off for me. I've considered moving to all grain but I really enjoy using extracts and that they give me a shortcut to refining other skills involved in brewing. I think I will put money into legging equipment and building a keezer before I get all grain equipment. Best hobby ever.
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Old 08-11-2013, 08:41 AM   #24
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I am so happy to find this thread. I have several brews under my belt and have been brewing for around six months.
First off, I have a tiny kitchen. Like a you can touch the fridge, sink, stove, prep counter, and door without moving tiny. So I really enjoy the ease, compaction, and efficiency of extract brewing. I read about brewing a lot, have made changes to per made kits, and now order custom "kits" to my specs. What grains I want, what extract, hops, etc. I feel that I am simply outsourcing my malt extraction process, and I am taking care of the rest.
I think there is plenty of room for the artistry of brewing using the base canvas of a malt extract. No one condemns the painter for not making the canvas, the musician for not making the instrument which they use to create their magic. This thread excites me greatly.
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Old 08-11-2013, 12:24 PM   #25
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I have a question for you all. Yesterday (8/10) I brewed up Northern Brewer's Lakefront Brewing 's Fixed Gear kit. In the instructions it said "Lakefront recommends a 90 min boil" I'm wondering what would the benefit of a 90 min boil be with an extract kit? I did it and even with late addition of the LME my beer is dark. So I figure to scorched the wort boiling that long. Thanks for the help! Cheers.

To the OP, thanks for this thread. I've been brewing since October of last year. I have 1 PM out my belt the rest have been kits. Not really sure I want to make the jump to all grain. But I do want go make great beer. Brew On!

BTW here's a like to the kit's instructions
http://www.northernbrewer.com/docume..._Lakefront.pdf
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Old 08-11-2013, 12:27 PM   #26
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I have a question for you all. Yesterday (8/10) I brewed up Northern Brewer's Lakefront Brewing 's Fixed Gear kit. In the instructions it said "Lakefront recommends a 90 min boil" I'm wondering what would the benefit of a 90 min boil be with an extract kit? I did it and even with late addition of the LME my beer is dark. So I figure to scorched the wort boiling that long. Thanks for the help! Cheers.
To the OP, thanks for this thread. I've been brewing since October of last year. I have 1 PM out my belt the rest have been kits. Not really sure I want to make the jump to all grain. But I do want go make great beer. Brew On!
BTW here's a like to the kit's instructions
http://www.northernbrewer.com/docume..._Lakefront.pdf
The only thing I can think of for a 90 Minute boil would be hops.
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Old 08-11-2013, 12:43 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by BxBrewer

Some would think that sparging the steeping grains is moot. We're only trying to get as much color and flavor out of them. not sugars. Again to me its all about going the extra mile on brew day. I bring up a small amount of water to 170 to sparge with. It's simply rinsing the grains.

My boil volumes change very little. In the end your still left with 5 gal if doing full boils. In our case Steep small and brew big. After we're done steeping and rinsing the grains. We then fill our boil pot to boil levels ie partial boils or full boils.
I'm doing full boils and it can take some time for my kettle to get to a boil... About 40 min maybe? I never really thought about steeping in less my full boil volume, but this makes sense to me... So to save time I figure I could steep my grains on the stovetop as I start bringing my kettle to a boil. Im assuming there are no negatives to doing this, but I thought I'd bring it up so, if there are any issues, someone could point them out before I try this out .
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Old 08-11-2013, 12:44 PM   #28
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Quote:
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The only thing I can think of for a 90 Minute boil would be hops.
Fist hop add was at 60 min. That's what threw me off when I read over the sheet... Thanks for the reply. Cheers!
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Old 08-11-2013, 12:53 PM   #29
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Fist hop add was at 60 min. That's what threw me off when I read over the sheet... Thanks for the reply. Cheers!
Okay, then that's strange.
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Old 08-11-2013, 01:04 PM   #30
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Jiffy Mixer
great tip thanks for the info I need to pick one up

all the best

S_M


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I'ma make a beer. It'll have barley. Hops too. I'll like it, my wife will hate it.
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