Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Priming sugar with cold crashed beer. why use half as much sugar?
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:13 PM   #1
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Default Priming sugar with cold crashed beer. why use half as much sugar?

I got brewers friend on my android. When I changed the field for temperature from 68* to 38* (F) it cut the amount of sugar needed in half.

Could someone explain this to me?


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Old 08-08-2013, 10:18 PM   #2
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I got brewers friend on my android. When I changed the field for temperature from 68* to 38* (F) it cut the amount of sugar needed in half.

Could someone explain this to me?
That temperature setting is meant for the temp at which the beer fermented. The temp the beer was fermented at changes how much CO2 stays in solution. You won't gain any more CO2 after cold crashing since it already has as much in solution as it is going to get, assuming it was finished fermenting.


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Old 08-08-2013, 10:20 PM   #3
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This might help explain it better.

http://byo.com/stories/item/1271-priming-with-sugar
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:21 PM   #4
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:32 PM   #5
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I should also point out that this is a highly debated topic. My $.02 is that unless you bring the beer temp up to an extremely high temp after fermentation completes, say bring it up from 62* to 72*, you're not going to lose much CO2. If you're going from 65* to 70* you're probably venting some, but that would be less than .25 volumes. I'm no expert on the matter and I think Revvy and others who disagree with him both have good points.

I can tell you for certain that you're not going to absorb more CO2 into solution after cold crashing because you would have started with a volume of x and that volume won't go up unless there is more CO2 being generated, so it will still be x after the temp drops.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/eff...-needs-134347/
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:40 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Brewmex41 View Post
I got brewers friend on my android. When I changed the field for temperature from 68* to 38* (F) it cut the amount of sugar needed in half.

Could someone explain this to me?
The short answer, as already explained, is "it doesn't".

I hate those priming calculators! The temperature is almost always unimportant, as even with lagers they often have a diacetyl rest in the 60s, and are very confusing to people who try to use them. Also, they have you prime "to style". That's all well and good, if you're accustomed to that, but most people in the US who buy bottled commercial beer do not drink them "to style" and expect about 2.4-2.7 volumes of carbonation in all bottled beer.

The calculator would have you make your English brown carbed to something like 1.5 volumes (totally flat) and your wits to 4.5 volumes (bottle bombs).

Just like with every set of instructions, always ask yourself if something makes sense. If it doesn't it probably is wrong.
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:48 PM   #7
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The app says:
Temperature at bottling:________ (F)
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:51 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Yooper View Post

The short answer, as already explained, is "it doesn't".

I hate those priming calculators! The temperature is almost always unimportant, as even with lagers they often have a diacetyl rest in the 60s, and are very confusing to people who try to use them. Also, they have you prime "to style". That's all well and good, if you're accustomed to that, but most people in the US who buy bottled commercial beer do not drink them "to style" and expect about 2.4-2.7 volumes of carbonation in all bottled beer.

The calculator would have you make your English brown carbed to something like 1.5 volumes (totally flat) and your wits to 4.5 volumes (bottle bombs).

Just like with every set of instructions, always ask yourself if something makes sense. If it doesn't it probably is wrong.
So I should leave the temperature field at a room temperature?
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:57 PM   #9
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You can either go by the highest temp the beer was at during active fermentation, or you can go by the highest temp the beer has been at since then. Unless you had some wild temp swings I don't think it will make much difference either way.

For my batches, unless it is an English style or a stout, I just prime with 4.5oz to a 5 gallon batch and call it day. Seriously I wouldn't put too much into it, as Yooper said, those calculators are a mess.
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Old 08-08-2013, 11:12 PM   #10
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For my batches, unless it is an English style or a stout, I just prime with 4.5oz to a 5 gallon batch and call it day.
I even prime most of my English beers that way- as cask ales are great, but I don't want my bottled beer flat.


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