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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Recycled yeast, no maltiness?
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Old 12-12-2005, 07:11 PM   #1
casebrew
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Default Recycled yeast, no maltiness?

I've been brewing an AG nut brown with Rye, using Nottingham. I recycled the yeast for a couple batchs by pouring the sediment from primary into a beer bottle, then putting an air lock on it, in the fridge. It sure did make beer, just not as malty as I liked. Did I breed a yeast that liked to eat the maltiness? Makes me wonderr if they make a particular yeast by feeding it some recipe other than that which is expected in final use? Or was it my shift in grains from the $1.59 pale to the .79 stuff a bigger factor? A 5 gallon batch cost me $17, so I can afford fresh yeast...
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Old 12-12-2005, 07:16 PM   #2
Baron von BeeGee
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It is possible for yeast to mutate over generations, but according to my reading it usually requires > 10 generations before mutations become likely. I don't think mutations are related to what you feed the yeast (at least in terms of wort), but I don't really have any idea. Perhaps eolle is reading.

I would lean more towards your ingredients if they've changed. Also, did you keep data wrt efficiency, OG, and FG? Any changes there would affect the final product.

One other thought that occurs, if you're not 'washing' the yeast, but just scooping up trub, you are probably getting some hop residue and other precipitates that some people feel could affect your next batch. I've always washed, so I don't have any empirical data wrt that theory.
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Old 12-12-2005, 07:32 PM   #3
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i always recycle my yeast and have never had a problem with low maltiness. it does seem to begin to produce much more esters after about 5 batches. i think that the grains you used and your recipe are what gave it low maltiness. you used rye, which gives a crisp flavor not really a malty one. if you want more maltiness i'd add more malt next time you make it, i don't think the yeast is to blame.
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Old 12-13-2005, 01:13 AM   #4
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I've used the Rye in every batch. It adds a nice spiceness, though I was hoping for a Kvass flavor. AAAnd, I may have made every newbie mistake in mashing, spraying wort out of a dropped hose, missing the hot break, etc. This time, I caught the hot break, but missed the pot of primeing to burn to coal on the inside stove...But i think my biggest variables were recycling yeast, and changing from a "brown malt" to the light, cheap stuff. Maybe next batch I'll roast some of the 'filler'...
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