Prevention of chill haze - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Prevention of chill haze

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-24-2013, 01:29 PM   #1
bobtheUKbrewer2
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Posts: 216
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts



First of all I am a UK brewer so I ferment 4 to 8 days, then bottle.

I have read up on the problem, and for a very pale bitter the advice seems to be:

1) add mashing water from the bottom to avoid stirring
2) mash out at 75 deg C for 20 minutes
3) do not over sparge
4) avoid splashing when transferring to boiler
5) cool as quickly as possible after boil

does anybody disagree with these and/or have any more ideas?

does anybody use papain?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 01:44 PM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2006
UP of Michigan, Winter Texan
Posts: 69,421
Liked 7845 Times on 5497 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtheUKbrewer2 View Post
First of all I am a UK brewer so I ferment 4 to 8 days, then bottle.

I have read up on the problem, and for a very pale bitter the advice seems to be:

1) add mashing water from the bottom to avoid stirring
2) mash out at 75 deg C for 20 minutes
3) do not over sparge
4) avoid splashing when transferring to boiler
5) cool as quickly as possible after boil

does anybody disagree with these and/or have any more ideas?

does anybody use papain?
I don't think #1, 2, 3, or 4 play a part at all in chill haze.

A good hot break is imperative for clear beer, and a good cold break (I use whirlfloc in the kettle) will get prevent chill haze from forming.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 06:42 PM   #3
hunter_la5
Sheriff Underscore
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
hunter_la5's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2012
New Braunfels, Texas
Posts: 12,791
Liked 5771 Times on 3307 Posts


Cold crashing the beer after fermentation has completed followed by the addition of gelatin finings should help.
__________________
:taco:

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 07:30 PM   #4
bobtheUKbrewer2
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Posts: 216
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


1 2 3 4 came from an expert who published - will dig out the reference and post it.

Cold crashing is not an option for me.

I boil vigorously for 60 minutes then cool down to tap water temperature in about 20 minutes.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 07:34 PM   #5
bobtheUKbrewer2
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Posts: 216
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Hot Side Aeration and Beer Stability by Micah Millspaw
Introduction This article was originally published in the American magazine Zymurgy and looks at hot side aeration and beer stability, the reactive effects of oxygen on hot wort and some methods for reducing the effects.

Oxidation and Melanoidins It is known that oxidation plays an important part in the formation of protein haze and that compounds known as melanoidins function as anti-oxidants and prevent the oxidation of protein. Oxidation also plays an important part in the production of colloidal haze, hence the name "oxidation haze", first coined by Helm, the German brewing scientist, in early part of this century.
Moreover, the formation of chill haze is also considerably increased by oxidation
Minimising Aeration
What can you do about hot side aeration?
There are several ways to limit aeration of your hot wort. It is best to start at the beginning, with the mash.
I will describe a mashing technique that is fairly simple, efficient and not too different from what is now common practice. Infusion mashing or step infusion in a combination mash / lauter vessel is very effective at achieving adequate starch conversion when using North American grown barley malt (with its abundance of enzymes).
The grain in the mash should be underlet or infused with hot water from the bottom up. This may be accomplished by simply adding a down tube to hot water inlet or by adding an inlet below a false bottom in a mash / lauter vessel. By infusing in this manner, stirring of the grains to insure uniform mixing of the grain and hot water is not necessary. By not stirring the water into the mash, hot oxygen reactions can be reduced.
At the end of the mash it is important to do a mash out, that is an upward (temperature) infusion step and rest. This mash out is a good time to add in the specialty grains. The mash should be infused with hot water sufficient to bring up the temperature to 77°C/170°F and hold it for 15-20 minutes.
I believe that a shortage of lipids may be a problem that homebrewers encounter because of their obsession with mash extraction yields. This need to eke out every trace of sugar from a mash, leads home brewers to practice wort recycling, vorlauf, and / or flaufing. These can be risky sparging techniques with regard to hot side aeration as well as stripping lipids from the wort.
. Some care should be taken in the transfer of hot wort from the mash / lauter vessel to the kettle. Splashing of the hot wort should be avoided.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 07:38 PM   #6
Matt3989
Recipes 
 
Aug 2012
Posts: 449
Liked 48 Times on 39 Posts


I've heard of people trying to scoop of the hot break, I've tried it but didn't see much difference, although it did keep my beer from boiling over.

Never heard of adding sparge Easter from the bottom, I feel like you need to stir it up so you can get all the sugars off of the grains.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 07:40 PM   #7
Matt3989
Recipes 
 
Aug 2012
Posts: 449
Liked 48 Times on 39 Posts


Nice article, thanks for digging that up.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 11:30 PM   #8
bobtheUKbrewer2
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Posts: 216
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


it wasnt the ful article of course...........

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2013, 12:22 AM   #9
JLem
 
JLem's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,636
Liked 178 Times on 154 Posts


what does being a UK brewer have to do with your fermentation time?
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar

daksin Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2013, 07:39 AM   #10
bobtheUKbrewer2
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Posts: 216
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


In UK we tend to ferment down to close to end point then bottle condition. I don't know of anybody in UK who leaves say 2 weeks in primary and 2 weeks in secondary. Once beer is down to say .002 of FG we bottle. Amazed nobody has mentioned bottle bombs, smiles.....

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Chill Haze Prevention Nomad All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 20 06-01-2013 01:49 AM
I have Chill Haze TyGuy716 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 03-18-2013 12:00 AM
NO CHILL beer, and chill haze... UGH The Pol General Techniques 62 01-16-2013 11:12 PM
Chill haze? What chill haze? Newton General Beer Discussion 7 05-23-2010 12:05 AM
Haze, but not chill haze redketchup Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 01-15-2010 01:16 PM


Forum Jump