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Old 07-14-2013, 02:50 PM   #1
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Default priming sugar

Im going to bottle today and i have 5 gallons of an all cascade pale ale

i have been reading that you should not use the whole 5oz package of priming sugar that i bought....

I guess i have 2 questions... Whats the best online calculator to use?

And does the current temp of the beer matter that mich?


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Old 07-14-2013, 03:01 PM   #2
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Yes, enter the current temp of the beer and follow the calculations. NorthernBrewer.com/priming is the one I use and it has never failed me


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Old 07-14-2013, 03:20 PM   #3
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Curious - why does the "current" temperature of the beer matter? Wouldn't the temperature you plan to condition at matter more? I am not seeing how current temperature of beer affects the amount of available sugar you are delivering for the yeast to eat during conditioning period. What am I missing?
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Old 07-14-2013, 03:52 PM   #4
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Old 07-14-2013, 03:59 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Braufessor View Post
Curious - why does the "current" temperature of the beer matter? Wouldn't the temperature you plan to condition at matter more? I am not seeing how current temperature of beer affects the amount of available sugar you are delivering for the yeast to eat during conditioning period. What am I missing?
You're right, partially!

Conditioning temperature and current temperature do not matter. The only way temperature matters is the fermentation temperature at or after fermentaion.

Here's why- the calculators (which I HATE by the way!) try to guestimate the probably amount of dissolved co2 in the beer. Since warmer temperatures cause more co2 to exit the airlock, a beer fermented and kept at 62 would have more dissolved co2 in it than a beer fermented at 65 and then raised to 72. That's why you should use the highest temperature the beer ever reached with an airlock on it.

Now, as to why I hate those calculators- first, because of the temperature issue as mentioned. Secondly, the whole priming "to style" thing. Sure, it's true that traditionally English cask ales are almost flat while geuze is highly carbed- but most people are accustomed to bottled beer commercially always being in the 2.4-2.6 volumes of co2 range. If you prime "to style" using those calculators, you could have a flat English bitter or a bottle bomb of gueze.

That's a long way of saying that in general, use .75 ounce- 1 ounce corn sugar per finished gallon of beer. If you want a slightly lower carb, use the .75 ounces. If you want a decent carb like a commercial beer, use 1 ounce corn sugar per gallon. In other words, 4-5 ounces of corn sugar by weight per batch. It always works!
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Old 07-14-2013, 04:07 PM   #6
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Typing in the temp in which fermentation 'completed' at, is just a tool to "estimate" how saturated the beer is with co2, from the fermentation.
There are many other factors contributing to residual co2, so no, it doesn't matter that much.
I've found that just about every online calculator gives the exact same priming sugar suggestion.
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Old 07-14-2013, 04:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
You're right, partially!



Here's why- the calculators (which I HATE by the way!) try to guestimate the probably amount of dissolved co2 in the beer. Since warmer temperatures cause more co2 to exit the airlock, a beer fermented and kept at 62 would have more dissolved co2 in it than a beer fermented at 65 and then raised to 72.
oh - that makes sense. Did not think about the CO2 the beer was already holding.

I have never really measured priming sugar that specifically -Just always went 2/3 - 3/4 cup to 5 gallons when I was bottle conditioning.
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Old 07-14-2013, 05:57 PM   #8
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I use a digital scale I got at Walmart for $20. It goes to 10lbs. Pounds,kilograms,grams & ounces.
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Old 07-14-2013, 09:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post

You're right, partially!

Conditioning temperature and current temperature do not matter. The only way temperature matters is the fermentation temperature at or after fermentaion.

Here's why- the calculators (which I HATE by the way!) try to guestimate the probably amount of dissolved co2 in the beer. Since warmer temperatures cause more co2 to exit the airlock, a beer fermented and kept at 62 would have more dissolved co2 in it than a beer fermented at 65 and then raised to 72. That's why you should use the highest temperature the beer ever reached with an airlock on it.

Now, as to why I hate those calculators- first, because of the temperature issue as mentioned. Secondly, the whole priming "to style" thing. Sure, it's true that traditionally English cask ales are almost flat while geuze is highly carbed- but most people are accustomed to bottled beer commercially always being in the 2.4-2.6 volumes of co2 range. If you prime "to style" using those calculators, you could have a flat English bitter or a bottle bomb of gueze.

That's a long way of saying that in general, use .75 ounce- 1 ounce corn sugar per finished gallon of beer. If you want a slightly lower carb, use the .75 ounces. If you want a decent carb like a commercial beer, use 1 ounce corn sugar per gallon. In other words, 4-5 ounces of corn sugar by weight per batch. It always works!
Thank you.... This was very helpful and informative... I went with 4.5 to see if i can tell a difference
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Old 07-18-2013, 03:00 PM   #10
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Another common problem I see is that people measure priming sugar assuming they have say, 5 gallons of beer. I always calculate and measure priming sugar based on the amount of beer that makes it into the bottling bucket after racking off the fermenter.


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