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Old 07-12-2013, 12:16 AM   #11

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Originally Posted by Elysium View Post
There is one thing that puzzles me about this process: what is the point of keeping 4 mason jars in the fridge when you could just open them after a couple of days (once the yeast has formed a nice layer at the bottom) and dump most of the excess water. Swirl with the little bit of water you leave in the jar (just to stir up the yeast at the bottom) and pour the content of the mason jars into one. Less space, 3 empty jars to wash more yeast, and you will need all the slur eventually for a 5-gallon batch (if you dont make a starter).

Any ideas if this would be a good idea to do (or good practice)?
a lot of brewers will only use a washed strain 5 to 7 time before they buy a new pack or vial. Look at it this way. I buy a pack of yeast and use it one time i wash it and get 4 more. each of those yeast have been used once. now i make 4 more batches of beer and wash the last one and get 4 more jars of which have only been used twice. If i keep repeating this process i can make 20 or so batches and still only have used the same strain 5 times. buy combining the jars and using just the one jar you can only use it for 5 to 7 batches. oh and yes i do use that method all the time, its what started me washing yeast in the first place
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:46 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by jmccraney View Post
... Just make sure you make a starter, I wouldn't recommend pitching washed yeast without one unless it's within a week of harvest...
Weeeeellllll, maybe... using the Mr Malty pitch rate calculator, yeast with starter can be replaced with yeast slurry of the appropriate amount. If its an ale you are pitching into, then we want some growth and some lag. If an ale takes off too soon it may be low in esters and less flavorful. If its a lager, then yes ALWAYS make a starter. Starters are always good practice though and good ways to "proof" the yeast. Rock it bruther
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Old 07-12-2013, 01:49 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by McCuckerson View Post
Starters are always good practice though and good ways to "proof" the yeast. Rock it bruther
Yes, this was more my point. I wasn't suggesting he over pitch, just that it's a good way to ensure yeast health.

 
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Old 07-12-2013, 01:50 AM   #14
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I am wondering what the point of washing yeast is in general since Chris White said the risks outweigh the benefits. Just leave a bit of beer at the end after racking and swirl a bunch. You will get a nice thick slurry and then you can pour that into as many jars as you want.

With highly flocculant yeasts such as 002/1968 you should just scoop out what you want. Swirling and letting it settle won't work--you run a risk of getting only the less flocculant yeast. Trust me.
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:23 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rexbanner View Post
I am wondering what the point of washing yeast is in general since Chris White said the risks outweigh the benefits. Just leave a bit of beer at the end after racking and swirl a bunch. You will get a nice thick slurry and then you can pour that into as many jars as you want.

With highly flocculant yeasts such as 002/1968 you should just scoop out what you want. Swirling and letting it settle won't work--you run a risk of getting only the less flocculant yeast. Trust me.
Thanks for the reply. Let's see if I understand you correctly.....in a jar there can be difference between yeast cells regarding how flocculant they are?

 
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:22 AM   #16

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Originally Posted by rexbanner View Post
I am wondering what the point of washing yeast is in general since Chris White said the risks outweigh the benefits. Just leave a bit of beer at the end after racking and swirl a bunch. You will get a nice thick slurry and then you can pour that into as many jars as you want.
The point of washing is to separate all the junk and dead yeast from the good yeast.
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:50 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rexbanner View Post
I am wondering what the point of washing yeast is in general since Chris White said the risks outweigh the benefits. Just leave a bit of beer at the end after racking and swirl a bunch. You will get a nice thick slurry and then you can pour that into as many jars as you want.

With highly flocculant yeasts such as 002/1968 you should just scoop out what you want. Swirling and letting it settle won't work--you run a risk of getting only the less flocculant yeast. Trust me.
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Originally Posted by Glynn View Post
The point of washing is to separate all the junk and dead yeast from the good yeast.
I think rexbanner is right. Plus, it's a decent amount of work to go through the whole washing routine compared to just saving all the slurry. Washing does a relatively poor job of separating dead yeast from good yeast anyway. Mostly it does a good job of throwing away yeast. As to whether or not it selects for less flocculant cells, I'm not sure, but it makes sense.

These two articles may be of interest (I'm posting them in reverse order):
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...revisited.html
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...g-exposed.html

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Old 07-12-2013, 12:57 PM   #18
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The reason you keep them in 3-4 separate jars is because you don't need ALL of that yeast for the next batch.

The yeast washed from 1 batch of beer is enough to do 3-4 more batches of beer. So you wash it out into 3-4 Mason jars, then when you do your next batch, you only need 1 jar. You have 2-3 left in the fridge for other batches.

If you put it all in one jar, yes you'd save space, but that one jar would have WAAAAAY more yeast than you'd need for a single batch of beer (unless, I suppose, you were using the yeast washed from a 5 gallon batch to pitch into a 1 bbl batch).

 
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:36 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Elysium View Post
Thanks for the reply. Let's see if I understand you correctly.....in a jar there can be difference between yeast cells regarding how flocculant they are?
Yep, during fermentation the yeast will settle at different rates, certain yeast cells are more flocculant than others. That's why when you are using a conical you dump the first bit, save the middle part, and dump the top part.

If you are using 1968 and try swirling it around you will never really get it to break up, no matter how vigorously you swirl. You will only get the slow flocculating cells and can end up with a beer that takes forever or never fully clears. It has happened to me. It's better to take a spoon and scoop it out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Glynn View Post
The point of washing is to separate all the junk and dead yeast from the good yeast.
True, but if you filter out the break when adding the wort to primary and reuse your yeast quickly after fermentation has ended, neither of those are issues.

The single most important factor when reusing yeast is the age.
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:42 PM   #20
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Wouldn't the best way to keep a cell line be, to create a large starter let is settle a bit, decant as much liquid off the top, save some of this for next time in a soda preform and keep the rest to pitch in your wort, if you still need some extra cells, add a little wort back into the starter and stir for a day maybe less. This would keep the yeast as close to what the manufacture intended, little mutation do to PH, temp, or OH. Of course slants would be the best but that includes a lot of extra steps..

 
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