Experimental Beer Grandpa Willies Hard Root Beer - Page 2 - Home Brew Forums
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Old 07-10-2013, 02:29 AM   #11
wombatfarms
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Jan 2013
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When you talk about stabilize is that Potassium Sorbate or metabisulfite?



 
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Old 07-10-2013, 09:07 AM   #12
Bauerbrewery1989
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Jun 2013
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Kingboomer-I boiled for about 30 min. Since there are no hops and its using an extract, you wouldn't need the normal 60+ boil time. If you wanted to make it a true "beer" with hops add you would need to boil longer.

Wombatfarms- I actually just finished stabilizing a 3 gallon batch. I used both potassium sorbate and campden tablets (potassium metabisulfate) The campden tablets are technically not nessessary, since its main job is as an antioxidant, and will only "stun" the yeast, not kill. I've always used them together however with great results.



 
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Old 07-25-2013, 03:10 PM   #13
Budvar
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Mar 2012
Houston, TX
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Would it be possible to pasteurize the bottles after they've reached idea carbonation or would that affect the flavor too much? I'd like to store this indefinitely at room temperature.

 
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Old 07-25-2013, 04:42 PM   #14
reverendj1
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Dec 2012
Jenison, Michigan
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Have you put beer in your keg after kegging this, or used your bottling bucket on other beers after this? I had heard that there is something in root beer that you just can't get out of plastic (tubing, buckets, etc.). This was actually how a very well known Grand Rapids brewery got one of their first taps. The bar said they couldn't sell some beer that normally sells very well, and the brewery could have their tap. So the brewer took a glass of it, and asked when they had last pushed root beer through that line. It was over a year before! Anyway, they changed the lines, and the rest is history. Anyways, I'd just like to know, since this sounds awesome, and I just want to be careful.

 
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Old 07-26-2013, 12:45 AM   #15
Bauerbrewery1989
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Jun 2013
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Budvar- as far as I know, nobody has tried pasteurizing so it might be a good experiment to try, I don't know how the heat would effect the flavor.

Reverendj1- I used all glass for fermenters, and a tube straight from the fermenter to the bottles, (I have a bottling spigot I use) so I haven't had any experience in the way of bottling buckets with this. When it comes to the kegging, this is my first brew I used with the keg, so I'm not sure. I would assume though it would take the root beer sitting in the line for an extended amount of time for any real flavor to stain in the line, but this is purely an assumption. Thank you for bringing that up, it might be a good idea to make this before you want to change lines just to be sure. I used a picnic tap but I'm not sure what you would do with something like a kegorator.

 
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Old 09-10-2013, 06:00 PM   #16
BrewmeisterSmith
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Oct 2012
Kalamazoo, MI
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I'm thinking about trying this one. Is there any harm in letting this ferment in the primary for 15 days? Also, how much yeast did you pitch for a 1 gallon batch? The whole packet of Nottingham? Once you bottle, how long do you wait until the flavor is at it's peak? If I refrigerate once the carbonation is where I want it to be, could I store this at room temp or would fermentation start up again? Thanks!
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:57 AM   #17
Bauerbrewery1989
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I don't see any harm letting it sit for awhile. I'm actually letting a batch I made on Labor Day sit for about 14-18, depending on when I get to it. I used an entire packet of Nottingham. It took about a week for this to peak after it was carbed. This is definitely a quick drinker. Once its properly carbed, it will have to stay in the fridge. The cold doesn't kill the yeast, just puts it in a dormant state, and taking it out back to room temp will wake them up again, and you'll end up with bottle bombs. I'm working on a specialty grain recipe and different mash temps to get enough unfermentables to where this wont be a problem.

 
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Old 09-13-2013, 10:48 PM   #18
BrewmeisterSmith
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Oct 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bauerbrewery1989 View Post
I don't see any harm letting it sit for awhile. I'm actually letting a batch I made on Labor Day sit for about 14-18, depending on when I get to it. I used an entire packet of Nottingham. It took about a week for this to peak after it was carbed. This is definitely a quick drinker. Once its properly carbed, it will have to stay in the fridge. The cold doesn't kill the yeast, just puts it in a dormant state, and taking it out back to room temp will wake them up again, and you'll end up with bottle bombs. I'm working on a specialty grain recipe and different mash temps to get enough unfermentables to where this wont be a problem.
Maybe this is a silly question, but wouldn't there be a way to carbonate it properly over the course of a couple of weeks using a calculated amount of priming sugar, or whatever? Why risk the bottle bombs?
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"I enjoy a pint of beer each night for its health benefits. The other pints are for my witty comebacks and flawless dance moves." -unknown

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Old 09-14-2013, 12:09 AM   #19
Bauerbrewery1989
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Jun 2013
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It's because the sugar is not only for carbing, but also to give the finished root beer sweetness. Ever had unsweetened root beer? Not very good. It's just the unfermentables don't lend enough sweetness. The problem is the yeast don't know when to stop.

 
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:06 AM   #20
sfgoat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bauerbrewery1989 View Post
It's because the sugar is not only for carbing, but also to give the finished root beer sweetness. Ever had unsweetened root beer? Not very good. It's just the unfermentables don't lend enough sweetness. The problem is the yeast don't know when to stop.
What about using lactose to sweeten and sugar to prime?



 
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