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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > Extract/homebrew twang
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Old 07-01-2013, 12:16 PM   #1
jessej122
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Default Extract/homebrew twang

I've done about 6 extract batches they've turned out good but they all have a little twang or certain smell to them anyone know why?


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Old 07-01-2013, 12:24 PM   #2
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twang isn't really a flavor descriptor.

sometimes it helps to add 2/3 of the extract at the end of the boil.


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Old 07-01-2013, 12:28 PM   #3
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It's just a different kind of smell to it more sweet
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Old 07-01-2013, 12:28 PM   #4
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What kind of yeast/hops are you using? I used to ave a twang in my beer until I went to full boils. Try different approaches, different recipes, until you find what you like
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Old 07-01-2013, 12:35 PM   #5
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Do you control your fermentation temperature? Temps outside of your yeast's range can produce off flavors that people often refer to as a "homebrew twang".
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Old 07-01-2013, 12:55 PM   #6
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@shakybones no I don't have the ability to control the temp,ferment in my basement where it's usually 66-70 depending on the weather think that's the problem?
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Old 07-01-2013, 01:29 PM   #7
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Not controlling the temp can definitely lead to off flavors. If the ambient temp is 70, your fermentation temperature will be noticeably higher. Look up swamp coolers, they're a cheap and effective way to control the temp without taking up much space either.
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Old 07-01-2013, 11:25 PM   #8
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As KepowOb (?!?) said, you should do your best to control your temps. You can also select yeast that has a bit higher range or is more forgiving. US-05 has been pretty kind to me, as I use a water bath + ice bottles/packs (my temps vary in the 65-70F range).

If you need to go higher, consider a Saison, if you are into that sort of thing.

Speaking of yeast, the proper pitch rate can also help control off flavors. For 5 gal, they recommend pitching 2 packs of dry yeast. For liquid, most folks in the know prepare a starter. There are threads that deal with this issue.

Oh, one more thing...don't pitch until your wort is cooled to 70F!
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Old 07-01-2013, 11:44 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakybones

Oh, one more thing...don't pitch until your wort is cooled to 70F!
^this.
Ester production is most prominent in the first few days of fermentation. Be sure your good and cool before you aerate and pitch.
This will increase the dissolved O2 in the wort and insure the yeast starts in the zone instead of throwing esters from being too warm. After day 3 it's less important and may benefit from a ferm of 70+ to allow the yeast to do some clean-up before dropping out.
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Old 07-02-2013, 03:31 AM   #10
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I had a slight "twang" to my beers early on with homebrewing. I think that trying to keep the temperature down has helped with that. I use a large plastic bin that I put some water in and then I wrap my carboys in wet t-shirts. Also, being in Miami, I try to make styles that ferment warmer and yeasts that are more forgiving. Also make sure to chill the wort all the way.


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