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Old 07-22-2013, 06:34 PM   #11
sweetcell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNGabe View Post
Bottles aren't very likely to explode when they over carbonate slowly. During bottle refermentation, the pressure is well over the target until the co2 dissolves in the beer. When a beer slowly over-carbs, there is plenty of time for the co2 to dissolve.
i'd love to get confirmation or denial about this from someone better versed in the physics of gases, but i do not believe there is a point when all (or more) of the gas is in the head space, under high pressure, waiting to re-enter the beer. it's a constant equilibrium (re: Henry's law). temperature will affect how much gas is in the beer vs. the headspace, but at a given temp the pressures will be in equilibrium.

again, happy to be told i'm wrong...
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- Drinking: ECY20 rye sour, local sour cherry kriek #2, Imperial Chocolate Milk Stout (half on vanilla, half on coconut), sour blond on second-use cherries, English Barleywine
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Old 07-23-2013, 02:00 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcell View Post
i'd love to get confirmation or denial about this from someone better versed in the physics of gases, but i do not believe there is a point when all (or more) of the gas is in the head space, under high pressure, waiting to re-enter the beer. it's a constant equilibrium (re: Henry's law). temperature will affect how much gas is in the beer vs. the headspace, but at a given temp the pressures will be in equilibrium.

again, happy to be told i'm wrong...
I've never really thought about why, i just know I can see co2 bubbles leaving the beer during an active bottle refermentation and that if open a beer after say 24 hrs or so, there's a bunch of gas and the beer is still flat.

But maybe this is what you're looking for.

"... the solubility of a gas in a liquid is directly proportional to the pressure of that gas above the surface of the solution."

"(A) Low pressure, low concentration of gas solubility. Decreased pressure allows more gas molecules to be present, with very little being dissolved in solution.
(B) High pressure, high concentration of gas solubility. Increased pressure forces the gas molecules into the solution, relieving the pressure that is applied, causing there to be less
gas molecules present and more of it in solution."
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Old 07-23-2013, 02:35 AM   #13
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You should see the bottle refermentations when i package in 3L or bigger bottles. They get a mini krausen in the bottle and the liquid expands quite a bit due to the carb. I fill them warm so I know its not thermal. I have to take that expansion into consideration for cork depth and head space especially on my 9L bottle.
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Old 10-17-2013, 05:14 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNGabe View Post
But maybe this is what you're looking for.

"... the solubility of a gas in a liquid is directly proportional to the pressure of that gas above the surface of the solution."

"(A) Low pressure, low concentration of gas solubility. Decreased pressure allows more gas molecules to be present, with very little being dissolved in solution.
(B) High pressure, high concentration of gas solubility. Increased pressure forces the gas molecules into the solution, relieving the pressure that is applied, causing there to be less
gas molecules present and more of it in solution."
we may be in agreement here. based on the two states described, the beer is either in a low pressure/low solubility situation; or in a high pressure/high solubility situation - so pressure and solubility of CO2 remain in a constant balance. at no point does all the CO2 jump into the headspace and then later go into the liquid - it's a constant equilibrium where as the pressure in the headspace raises 1 unit, the pressure in the liquid below increases by the same amount.
__________________
What hops should I grow? Looking for cheap honey?
- Drinking: ECY20 rye sour, local sour cherry kriek #2, Imperial Chocolate Milk Stout (half on vanilla, half on coconut), sour blond on second-use cherries, English Barleywine
- Aging: English Barleywine on brett, 3726 saison w/ brett x2 (dregs mix & Lochristi), GNO 3724 saison w/ brett mix, cherry mead, acerglyn, and a few other sours...

 
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Old 10-17-2013, 09:32 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcell View Post
we may be in agreement here. based on the two states described, the beer is either in a low pressure/low solubility situation; or in a high pressure/high solubility situation - so pressure and solubility of CO2 remain in a constant balance. at no point does all the CO2 jump into the headspace and then later go into the liquid - it's a constant equilibrium where as the pressure in the headspace raises 1 unit, the pressure in the liquid below increases by the same amount.
What happend to you being happy to be told you are wrong? Read it again. When yeast makes CO2, it doesn't instantly disolve into solution, it reguires a certain amount of pressure before it will disolve. Decreased pressure allows more gas molecules to be present, with very little being dissolved in solution. This really isn't that different from why you can disolve more sugar in warm water than cold.
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