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Old 06-21-2013, 08:52 PM   #1
jhay_x7
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Default Esters in Berliner Weisse

I recently made a traditional sour mash Berliner Weisse (72 hours at 110F), did a full 60 min boil and pitched WLP001 to finish off the fermentation. The beer came out fantastic with a straw like color, sharp tartness and also a fruity ester character.

I submitted the beer to the Walk on the Wild Side competition in Florida and recently received my score sheets back. All of them agreed that is has an apricot and green apple/cider flavor profile, which I agree with, but I am not really sure where that characteristic came from. The beer fermented at 66F so I do not believe that the WLP001 threw off any esters due to temperature but can the ph of the wort have an impact on the yeast that would cause this?

One other thing, my grain bill did consist of 10% acidulated malt.


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Old 06-22-2013, 01:24 AM   #2
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If you did a sour mash, you're obviously targeting lacto, but you never know exactly what else is lurking there. My guess is that some wild yeast or some other microbe is responsible.


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Old 06-25-2013, 04:25 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingwood-kid View Post
If you did a sour mash, you're obviously targeting lacto, but you never know exactly what else is lurking there. My guess is that some wild yeast or some other microbe is responsible.
Enteric bacteria produce some very interesting flavor and aroma compounds that don't boil out. Acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid. They readily come from bacteria on the grain in a sour mash.
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Old 06-25-2013, 05:24 AM   #4
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Out of curiosity, did you sour 100% of the mash? Or a portion?
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There are actually techniques that some use that are an open fermentation where they basically ferment in a bucket covered in aluminu, alumini, aluemin... tin foil.
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Old 06-26-2013, 11:41 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt_Ester View Post
Out of curiosity, did you sour 100% of the mash? Or a portion?
100% sour mash for ~72 hours.


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