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Old 06-23-2011, 09:58 PM   #1031
beerman1957
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggy13 View Post
So the last few batches I made I decided to save the yeast. I took sanitized mason jars and poured what was left over after kegging from the bottom of my fermenter...left over beer and all. I put it in the fridge in the middle of March. It's now almost July and I plan on making a starter from it next weekend. Is this an acceptable way of doing it or should I go pick up some new vials of yeast? I really didn't wash it...I just collected what didn't fit in my keg and put it in the mason jar. The bottom half is all yeast and the top half is beer.
It may not re-activate. See article at White Labs:

http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/craft_yeast_storage.html

 
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Old 06-28-2011, 08:47 PM   #1032
natewv
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Jan 2011
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really dumb questions here:

1) Looking at the page 1 pictures, why not just give the remaining bit of beer in the primary, the trub, and the yeast a good shake...what's the point of adding water?

Also what really is the point of washing, just to separate the trub from the yeast and beer? You aren't really "washing" it as in separating it from the rest of the beer that was left over from racking, you are really only separating it from the trub and left over hops, right?

I want to make a cider tonight on an ale yeast cake but I used my bottling bucket (and need it) as my primary so in addition to racking the beer to secondary, I plan to remove all the trub/yeast/beer and put it into a new fermenter to throw the apple juice on top of. Is my best plan of attack, since I'm going through the trouble of moving the yeast to a new vessel, to follow the steps described in the illustrations? What else could I do more quickly to most efficiently separate the yeast from the trub/hops? How much of the slurry should I use, and (just to reiterate my original questions) what really am I trying to do in keeping just the 'stuff' that has not settled after shaking and let sit for 20 minutes?

 
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Old 06-28-2011, 10:59 PM   #1033
Chefencore
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Feb 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natewv View Post
really dumb questions here:

1) Looking at the page 1 pictures, why not just give the remaining bit of beer in the primary, the trub, and the yeast a good shake...what's the point of adding water?
The water gives the yeast a clean place to ‘hang out’ while all the trub falls out. It has been sanitized by the boil. Also, if you plan to store the yeast, the boil removes oxygen, so your beasties will sleep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by natewv View Post
Also what really is the point of washing, just to separate the trub from the yeast and beer? You aren't really "washing" it as in separating it from the rest of the beer that was left over from racking, you are really only separating it from the trub and left over hops, right?
Yes. The intention is to essentially leave you with just yeast. There will always be some stuff left in it, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by natewv View Post
I want to make a cider tonight on an ale yeast cake but I used my bottling bucket (and need it) as my primary so in addition to racking the beer to secondary, I plan to remove all the trub/yeast/beer and put it into a new fermenter to throw the apple juice on top of. Is my best plan of attack, since I'm going through the trouble of moving the yeast to a new vessel, to follow the steps described in the illustrations? What else could I do more quickly to most efficiently separate the yeast from the trub/hops? How much of the slurry should I use, and (just to reiterate my original questions) what really am I trying to do in keeping just the 'stuff' that has not settled after shaking and let sit for 20 minutes?
You can just sanitize well (I use a spray bottle) and transfer the entire cake to your fermenter.

If you want to wash, I suggest you use your bottling bucket. Just put in your boiled, cooled water, swirl, and wait. After 20 minutes or so, just open the valve and let the trub out. Then transfer your yeast slurry to your fermenter or whatever sanitized vessel you choose, leaving the ‘beer’ on top. (This will work best if you have one of those devices connected to the inside of your spigot that reaches to the bottom of your bottling bucket.) Just remember that this will add to the volume of your fermenter for your applewine.
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Old 06-29-2011, 12:57 PM   #1034
natewv
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Thanks! So another question, is there any way for me to guesstimate how much of this yeast I need to use to start off a new batch?

 
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Old 06-29-2011, 10:41 PM   #1035
DakotaRules
 
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Check out Mr. Malty. Mrmalty.com? Google search will find it.

 
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Old 06-30-2011, 09:35 PM   #1036
Brent_in_Aurora
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I washed some 1084 Irish Ale yeast from a primary fermenter. I boiled water and pint mason jars and stored it in my fridge for about a month. I tried to restart the yeast in a flask with 1/4 cup of DME and 600ml water, which was boiled and chilled to 70 degrees. I poured off most of the excess water and added the yeast that had separated out into two distinct layers on the bottom of the mason jar.

Since then, I have not detected much yeast activity. The bottom creamy layer may have increased, but no bubbles of CO2 perculating. There were some surface foam bubbles, but not much. I poured some off and tasted it and it did not taste sweet.

My question is the yeast dead?

 
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Old 06-30-2011, 10:14 PM   #1037
kapbrew13
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Mar 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent_in_Aurora
I washed some 1084 Irish Ale yeast from a primary fermenter. I boiled water and pint mason jars and stored it in my fridge for about a month. I tried to restart the yeast in a flask with 1/4 cup of DME and 600ml water, which was boiled and chilled to 70 degrees. I poured off most of the excess water and added the yeast that had separated out into two distinct layers on the bottom of the mason jar.

Since then, I have not detected much yeast activity. The bottom creamy layer may have increased, but no bubbles of CO2 perculating. There were some surface foam bubbles, but not much. I poured some off and tasted it and it did not taste sweet.

My question is the yeast dead?
Not tasting sweet would mean you water/dme solution isnt sweet. What was your gravity for the starter wort? Use a stirplate? What's covering your flask? Foil or airlock?

 
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Old 06-30-2011, 10:31 PM   #1038
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beerman1957 View Post
I have been brewing quite a while and I never have tried this. Perhaps I was just overwhelmed and then forgot. I think I will try to salvage some US-05 that is in fermentation stage now. The guide here is superb!
I only wash liquid yeasts because they are so much more expensive and sometimes rare (I have a few jars of pacman chillin away for my next IPA). I can buy a fresh pack of Safale 05 for around $2 so the extra effort to wash it and store it doesn't seem worth it to me.
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Old 06-30-2011, 11:31 PM   #1039
Brent_in_Aurora
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It has a foam boiling airlock. I didn't take the gravity as it was a small amount of wort, but it was roughly 1 part DME to 4 parts water in the boil. To that I added the yeast slurry from the mason jar. I will give it shot and if it doesn't fire up, I will check it and possibly add other yeast.

 
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Old 07-03-2011, 07:46 AM   #1040
Sokrateez
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Jun 2011
Kitchener, Ontario
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So I just washed the yeast out of this batch, and I just realised after looking in the fridge that I didn't fill them all the way to the top, probably like 75-80% of the way. Will this be a problem? And also I don't have anything to make a starter out of (no DME), but am hoping to brew tomorrow. Someone on here told me it would be alright to just pitch the whole jar in, but didn't follow up after that. What does everyone else think?

 
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