Really, ~9 oz DME for priming my Saison? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 06-04-2013, 02:43 AM   #1
JoppaFarms
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Hey all, I have a 5.0 gallon Saison that got up to 78 degrees while fermenting. Northern Brewer's priming sugar calculator says I need like 8.87 oz of DME to prime to a traditional 3.2 volumes.

This seems like a LOT to me and this is the first time I'm using DME to prime. It says it would be equivalent to 6.6 oz corn sugar which seems about right since 5 oz is generally about 2.4 volumes. Makes sense that another 0.8 volumes equates to 1.6 oz corn sugar.

I guess the 9 oz scares me. I don't want bottle bombs!

P.S. the beer has been fermenting in primary for 23 days and is down to 1.004 using 3711.



 
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Old 06-05-2013, 05:56 PM   #2
JoppaFarms
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50+ views and no one has bottle primed a saison?



 
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Old 06-05-2013, 06:02 PM   #3
Marc77
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I'm using 3711 now too and am dry hopping with Amarillo hops. I'll be bottling this weekend and I'm just going to use 4 oz of corn sugar. If you've got DME laying around to use then sure but I'd rather just spend the $1.50 and not have to worry about bottle bombs. ESPECIALLY since we both know just how crazy 3711 goes with fermentation.

 
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Old 06-05-2013, 07:20 PM   #4
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Sorry man, no experience here bottling with 3711, just kegging. But because that yeast is such a crazy fermenter, I would be cautious of using DME to prime. Calculators such as the one you are using assume a certain fermentability (I've seen as low as 55%) of the DME, whereas with corn sugar or cane sugar it is nearly 100%. But the ppg for each of those sugars is different among the calculators too, I often see corn sugar listed as 1.044-46 ppg comparable to sucrose, but due to the moisture content I think it is actually around 1.037.

Is there a reason you are using DME to prime instead of simple sugar? I never used DME for carbing and even went away from corn sugar toward the tail end of my bottling days. Just plain old table sugar, no problems. Just reduce any corn sugar priming amount by %20, and you're good to go. So in this case, I would say go with 5.3 oz of table sugar based on your 6.6 oz of corn sugar.

Using DME seems like too many variables, especially with this yeast that is capable of fermenting that DME more than the typical yeast.

 
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:38 PM   #5
JoppaFarms
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I wanted to try something different that simple sugar. Really thats the only reason. Now you've got me quite worried, hope I don't go home to bottle bombs or terrible gushers.

 
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Old 06-07-2013, 06:23 PM   #6
JoppaFarms
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Well, it's day 4 after bottling with 8.87 oz DME. I checked a flip top bottle to see where we are at, I know it's early, but I'm worried I over primed. It popped nicely, and then gushed....Not a BAD gush, but a definite gush. I guess 3711 and 8.87 was too much.

I'm trying to figure out what the cause of this is, to determine if it's a real problem and prevent it in the future. Was this caused by:

1) 4 days after bottling, the CO2 isn't even in solution yet
2) Bottle was opened at condition temp (high 70's, low 80's), and CO2 wasn't in solution
3) Too much priming sugar
4) Infection
5) Fermentation wasn't complete
6) Did not cold crash prior to bottling and a LOT of yeast was still in suspension

I'd like to rule out 4 & 5, the beer sat at 1.005 for over a week before bottling and I've yet to have an infection with my current cleaning/sanitizing steps. Infection COULD be a possibility, but unlikely given the large amount of DME I used and how strong 3711 is.

NOW I am really worried about bottle bombs. If I chill it now, will that help prevent bombs? Or do I really need to uncap and recap? I am prepared to uncap, but I would prefer not to because I have custom caps on the bottles and would lose them. Small price to pay, I know, but are there other options?

 
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Old 06-12-2013, 02:06 PM   #7
JoppaFarms
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Just to update this thread in case anyone else is watching or has similar questions.

I'm now 10 days after bottling, no bombs. Opened one yesterday after chilling over night, no gushing, solid carbonation for a Saison. Still could benefit from some further conditioning though. Looks like you CAN trust the calculators haha.
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Old 06-13-2013, 01:01 AM   #8
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Or you could go through the painstaking multiplication and figure it out by inputting the raw numbers without assumptions. Its not astrophysics just a little simple math. Then when you have your sugar weight figured out you do a little more multiplication using the fermentability disclosed by the company that makes your dme.
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Old 06-13-2013, 04:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smokinghole View Post
Or you could go through the painstaking multiplication...
why, if the calculator gives me the result i want?

 
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Old 06-13-2013, 09:17 PM   #10
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It removes doubt that the calculator is making the correct assumptions your beer. Go ahead and age beer for six months plus and then use a calculator. Chances are it will assume about double your actual residual CO2 and you will end up with much less carb than you anticipated.


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