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Old 05-24-2013, 02:02 PM   #1
ChaosStout
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So me and my GF where at a beer tasting last year and had a wonderful sour(Not sure what it was) that tasted like Balsamic vinegar. It was awesome stuff. Anyways Looking over the different bugs I cant seem to find which one would produce that wonderful flavor. If someone could point me to the right bugs to use and even a recipe/ Yeast selection I would be most grateful.

 
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Old 05-24-2013, 03:18 PM   #2
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If it taste like vinegar it might be acetobacter that produced acetic acid aka vinegar. I think temperature might affect the production of vinegar with pedio/lacto. Not 100% sure on that
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Old 05-24-2013, 03:22 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChaosStout View Post
So me and my GF where at a beer tasting last year and had a wonderful sour(Not sure what it was) that tasted like Balsamic vinegar. It was awesome stuff. Anyways Looking over the different bugs I cant seem to find which one would produce that wonderful flavor. If someone could point me to the right bugs to use and even a recipe/ Yeast selection I would be most grateful.
Flanders Reds often have a balsamic quality. If you are looking to replicate that style then Roeselare (Wyeast 3763) is a great strain.
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:35 PM   #4
ChaosStout
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Originally Posted by dcHokie View Post
Flanders Reds often have a balsamic quality. If you are looking to replicate that style then Roeselare (Wyeast 3763) is a great strain.
TYVM. Would I want to pitch another yeast like American Ale II 1272 first and then pitch the 3763 later?

 
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Old 05-25-2013, 02:08 PM   #5
mot
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Your tasting a flaw. Brewers try and stay away from vinegar (acetobacter) it is acceptable in Flanders red style to an extent. But if that's what you want it's very easy go make it thrives on oxygen

 
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Old 05-25-2013, 05:23 PM   #6
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Your tasting a flaw. Brewers try and stay away from vinegar (acetobacter) it is acceptable in Flanders red style to an extent. But if that's what you want it's very easy go make it thrives on oxygen
I don't necessarily agree with the flaw comment in the context of Flanders Reds. By definition they should have some acetic character to the extent that even BJCP lists acetobacter as a fermentation component. Duchesse de Bourgogne certainly exemplifies the style and it has loads of balsamic character.

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Originally Posted by ChaosStout View Post
TYVM. Would I want to pitch another yeast like American Ale II 1272 first and then pitch the 3763 later?
ChaosStout, there are a few schools of thought on fermentation schedule. You've basically described "the Jamil method" from Brewing Classic Styles which he recommends for a less sour Flemish Red. I favor pitching the Roeselare culture up front and letting it ride for 12-18 months, the longer the better IMHO.
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Old 05-25-2013, 07:44 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by dcHokie View Post
I don't necessarily agree with the flaw comment in the context of Flanders Reds. By definition they should have some acetic character to the extent that even BJCP lists acetobacter as a fermentation component. Duchesse de Bourgogne certainly exemplifies the style and it has loads of balsamic character.



ChaosStout, there are a few schools of thought on fermentation schedule. You've basically described "the Jamil method" from Brewing Classic Styles which he recommends for a less sour Flemish Red. I favor pitching the Roeselare culture up front and letting it ride for 12-18 months, the longer the better IMHO.
Like I said it is acceptable to an extent. A good Flanders with low acetic qualities is terrific compared to an acetic bomb.

Duchesse is a poor representation IMHO it is back sweetened like crazy and pasteurized.

 
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