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Old 08-01-2013, 07:39 PM   #21
stpug
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Nov 2012
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Cayenne works very well and when kept to a minimal amount you don't perceive the pepper at all. Your mind places the spiciness as part of the ginger.


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Old 08-01-2013, 08:27 PM   #22
Unferth
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Aug 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesdawsey View Post
Please let us know how it tastes when it's done. If it's delicious, share the recipe!
That kinda was my recipe... I don't really measure stuff as a rule. except specific gravity, that is.

I think I will try to backsweeten, since this is for SWMBO and she likes the sweet commercial ginger ale. I'll probably try Splenda or something on this round and see how that tastes. I've done the back-sweeten with fermentable sugars and pasteurize after carbonation process before with cider, and it is pretty simple, just time consuming.

Do do a full 2-3 week ferment? or do you just wait till Gravity readings slack off? I will be bottling.



 
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Old 08-03-2013, 06:37 PM   #23
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I made a batch last night and it is bubbling nicely in the fermenter at the moment. I used 1.4kg ginger, which I put through a blender and then froze. I took the ginger straight from the freezer and put it in the pot. This is the first time I have made this recipe, so can't compare to not freezing it but the flavor was STRONG!

Just one question. When it comes to bottling, do you churn it up to get the all the flavorful bits into each bottle?

 
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Old 08-07-2013, 08:45 PM   #24
jamesdawsey
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I don't bottle, but I put my ginger in a large hop bag and remove it after steeping so that there are no ginger bits to clog up my keg line. If you're bottling I don't see why stirring it up would be a bad idea. I'm not aware of anything in this recipe that would be damaged by oxygen exposure. There aren't any hop oils to react adversely with the air contact.

Sure, get some "flavorful bits into each bottle!"

 
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Old 08-07-2013, 08:53 PM   #25
jamesdawsey
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@stpug That makes three.

Sounds like cayenne's got to be the next addition to the ginger ale experiment. If that covers the bite up-front, then I'm still missing a good middle taste before the lingering warmth from the ginger settles in. I'll get back to you when I've figured it out.

 
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Old 08-08-2013, 07:26 PM   #26
gingerman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesdawsey
@stpug That makes three.

Sounds like cayenne's got to be the next addition to the ginger ale experiment. If that covers the bite up-front, then I'm still missing a good middle taste before the lingering warmth from the ginger settles in. I'll get back to you when I've figured it out.
My experience with the flavor profile is a bit different. Adding cayenne hasn't increased the up front bite for me (despite cayenne traditionally being associated with front of tongue/early heat), but rather its most evident as the late or residual heat. Not sure why that is - perhaps the sugar masks the heat until you swallow, and then once the sugar is swallowed, the residual burn is felt? Either way, I've noticed the cayenne's heat way more in the aftertaste than where I had expected it to be, up front. Adding a ton more ginger only seems to affect the ginger-ness (not heat), in my experience.

From my best batches, here's the sensory/flavor profile that I'm always aiming for, in order.

1. Smell - clean, aromatic/floral ginger notes as you bring the glass to mouth
2. Taste - very bubbly, sweet first taste. Carbonation is obviously key here.
3. Taste - mid-sip, full ginger flavor.
4. After taste - that cayenne heat. Should be just enough of a bite to immediately compel another sip.

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Old 08-08-2013, 07:53 PM   #27
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I boiled my batch on Friday and there has been activity in the airlock since Saturday. There is still is activity now. There is a decent size yeast cake at the bottom.

I sampled some and it tastes good. Swmbo had some and she wants me to serve it as is, without carbing it!


Is that yeast cake like a normal yeast cake - ie try not to get any into the bottles or is that where some flavor lies? I used a grain sack when I boiled so it is definitely not flakes of ginger that have settled to the bottom (well not flakes that are too large to get through a grain sack!)

 
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:21 PM   #28
gingerman
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If you used champagne yeast, it's fine if some of it is in the bottles. Can't speak to other yeasts though.

I personally siphon into bottles with all the yeast left on the bottom of the fermenter. Then, I siphone the yeast into a big measuring cup, and add a small bit to each bottle to bottle carb it. I end up adding maybe 1/4-1/3 of the yeasty water to the bottles, and dump the rest. This is usually perfect for 24-48 hour pressurizing before refrigeration.

If bottle carbing, make sure to bottle at least one in a plastic bottle so you can be confident in the pressure of the glass bottles. Good luck!

 
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Old 08-09-2013, 01:15 AM   #29
jamesdawsey
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Quote:
From my best batches, here's the sensory/flavor profile that I'm always aiming for, in order.

1. Smell - clean, aromatic/floral ginger notes as you bring the glass to mouth
2. Taste - very bubbly, sweet first taste. Carbonation is obviously key here.
3. Taste - mid-sip, full ginger flavor.
4. After taste - that cayenne heat. Should be just enough of a bite to immediately compel another sip.
That's the ticket! Props to you gingerman. And I believe I've got my recipe tweaked just enough to accomplish this for next time (I haven't gotten a chance to brew since I started this post , can you believe it?!? But soon!).

Quote:
Is that yeast cake like a normal yeast cake - ie try not to get any into the bottles or is that where some flavor lies?
Yes. Also, it does make a nice hot drink before fermentation for when it gets cold. Just add a splash of bourbon into your glass straight out of the steeping pot.

 
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Old 08-14-2013, 05:30 PM   #30
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I have bottled mine and it has come out nice! What can I expect to get from letting the bottles stand for a while - ie cold conditioning?



 
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