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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > American IPA and WLP002
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Old 05-16-2013, 08:13 PM   #1
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Default American IPA and WLP002

I need to use up my WLP002 and I want to make an American IPA.

I read that I should either add sugar to the boil or mash at a low temperature of I use WLP002 in an American IPA.

Is this necessary?.


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Old 05-16-2013, 08:18 PM   #2
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I can't imagine why you would have to do that. Regardless of where the fermentable sugars come from (as in from table sugar, from your malted grains, candi sugar rocks or syrup, etc.), that yeast should be able to handle it.

So I would say, no that's not specifically necessary. Mind telling where you read that?

Also, not telling you how to brew since doing things your way is the best part of brewing, but I personally wouldn't make an American IPA with that English ale strain. I would make an English style IPA or Brown ale. But that's me.


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Old 05-16-2013, 08:20 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PistolsAtDawn View Post
I can't imagine why you would have to do that. Regardless of where the fermentable sugars come from (as in from table sugar, from your malted grains, candi sugar rocks or syrup, etc.), that yeast should be able to handle it.

So I would say, no that's not specifically necessary. Mind telling where you read that?

Also, not telling you how to brew since doing things your way is the best part of brewing, but I personally wouldn't make an American IPA with that English ale strain. I would make an English style IPA or Brown ale. But that's me.
I found the idea here http://forum.northernbrewer.com/view...=95373#p860731
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Old 05-16-2013, 08:30 PM   #4
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I see. He (She?) was saying that because his beers come out malty, he's using sugar to thin out the final flavor. Table sugar will add alcohol without adding much flavor, so that will dilute any other grain flavor. It "drys" the final beer out, so to speak.

So the answer is still no. You do not have to add sugar. You can, but it's not required. Have a recipe in mind that you want to share?
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Old 05-16-2013, 08:38 PM   #5
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If I was making an IPA with 002 I'd try to keep the mash around 149ish. I wouldn't add any sugar. 002 is a fine yeast to make a pale or an IPA. It's close to the Stone strain and is recommended by them in their home brew recipes.
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Old 05-16-2013, 08:43 PM   #6
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Thanks for your response.

I was going to use a recipe from the following blog. This guy is a great home brewer in my opinion.

http://www.bertusbrewery.com/
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Old 05-16-2013, 09:09 PM   #7
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If you can, give it a big pitch and keep your fermentation temps on the lower end( 1.5X pitch at 62-64 ferment around 66) . You will not want a lot of fruity esters 002 can kick off in the beginning of fermentation.
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Old 05-16-2013, 09:12 PM   #8
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I cant keep the temp that low now that the hotter weather is here. I wish they would invent a cooling-belt for my fermenter./carboy.
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Old 05-16-2013, 09:15 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gold_Robber View Post
Thanks for your response.

I was going to use a recipe from the following blog. This guy is a great home brewer in my opinion.

http://www.bertusbrewery.com/
The PTY clone? I would definitely include the sugar in that one. The real PTY is a pretty dry beer and you want it to finish nice and low.
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Old 05-16-2013, 09:22 PM   #10
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pliny the younger ok.

Thanks for everyone's help.


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