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Old 05-15-2013, 06:07 PM   #1
beargrylls
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Default BARLEY WINE recipe critique!

Hello fellow brewers,
I am brewing a barley wine this week and have been looking at a bunch of recipes, while sort of formulating my own from what I have seen. The problem is, I have never brewed a BW and have not used many of the ingredients I am planning to buy, so I'm not sure if the combination of ingredients will work out as I intend. I am buying the grains tomorrow, so please give me feedback! Thanks!

3 GALLONS- 70% efficiency
7 lbs pale 2 row american
2 lbs Munich
1 lb flaked rye
6 oz Special B
6 oz C80
1 lb cane or brown sugar

1 oz centennial 10% 60 min
0.5 oz centennial 20 min
0.5 oz cascade 7% 15 min
0.5 oz cascade 5 min
0.5 oz cascade 0 min

Specifically I'm wondering if the C80 is needed. I want to keep the special B but Im not sure of the amount and whether to also include the C80.


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Old 05-15-2013, 08:19 PM   #2
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I think you'll be okay either way. When I made a barley wine this winter, I used some Special B (.25lbs for a 5 gallon batch) and some C60 (.75 lbs) and was very pleased with the result (though I haven't tasted a finished one yet--just gravity samples at bottling time).

I suppose it depends a bit on the flavor profile you want. Sticking with less Special B and more 40L/60L/Munich will keep your profile truly "malty." Special B and C80 will tend to add to caramel, burnt sugar, roasty and dried fruit flavors. You might want that, or you might think it muddies what is supposed to be a vehicle to show off malt. (It is, after all, possible to make a BW SMaSH.) Just depends on what you want to make.

In that vein, you might consider swapping out the American pale 2-row for something British. I think the touch of class is helpful, and BW is "supposed" to be malty.


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Old 05-15-2013, 09:04 PM   #3
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i think i might switch the c80 to c60 or even c40 then. it probably wont make a huge difference, but from what i understand, special b is just a really dark crystal malt, so pairing it with another dark crystal malt might not make alot of sense.
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Old 05-15-2013, 09:32 PM   #4
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alright here's the final (as of now) grain bill:

7.5 lbs Maris Otter
2.5 lbs Munich
1 lb flaked rye
4 oz Special B
8 oz C60
0.5 lb cane or brown sugar

any last thoughts?
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Old 05-15-2013, 10:08 PM   #5
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ok, if there's anyone still listening out there, what about this:

all cascade and northern brewer hop schedule.
I have 0.5 oz of NB and a ton of cascade.
maybe bittering with cascade and putting in NB around 15-5 min to get some mintyness?
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Old 05-15-2013, 11:02 PM   #6
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That grain bill looks good to me. I think I'd just use cane sugar, and you can consider upping it to a pound if you want to boost the gravity. Add it, boiled in a small amount of water and cooled, at high krauesen (works better for yeast metabolism).

If you plan to age the beer for a long time (which is typical for barley wines), the hops will definitely get muted. If you want some hop character after six months, make sure you're using enough to get the point across. I'm personally not sure that NB as a flavor hop would work with my idea of what BW should taste like. But it's your beer!
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Old 05-16-2013, 12:09 AM   #7
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why is adding the cane sugar at high krausen better for the yeast?
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Old 05-16-2013, 02:33 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beargrylls View Post
why is adding the cane sugar at high krausen better for the yeast?
When I was listening to podcast from Jamil, they talked about how the yeast will target maltotriose in the initial part of the fermentation and adding simple sugars later would stress the yeast less. They talked about how yeast always go for the simplest sugars first and maltotriose is a complex chain sugar the yeast have to break down. If they are given both at the same time, they will go after simple and possibly have trouble switching metabolism in a higher alcohol environment. I tried it in several Belgian beers with great success so using that same thought pattern with the Barleywine would I think prevent a stalled fermentation.
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Old 05-16-2013, 02:33 AM   #9
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ok so one last question. my hop schedule now looks like:

1 oz centennial 9.8% 60 min
0.25 oz cascade 7% 60 min
0.5 oz centennial 20 min
0.5 oz cascade 5 min
0.5 oz cascade 0 min
0.5 centennial 0 min

this gives me 87.5 IBUs
is that appropriate considering the grain bill? i want it to be noticeably hoppy but not into the IIPA range. i also want the malt to still come through as the primary taste, so is this going to be too many hops?
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Old 05-16-2013, 02:36 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyBeagleBrewing View Post
When I was listening to podcast from Jamil, they talked about how the yeast will target maltotriose in the initial part of the fermentation and adding simple sugars later would stress the yeast less. They talked about how yeast always go for the simplest sugars first and maltotriose is a complex chain sugar the yeast have to break down. If they are given both at the same time, they will go after simple and possibly have trouble switching metabolism in a higher alcohol environment. I tried it in several Belgian beers with great success so using that same thought pattern with the Barleywine would I think prevent a stalled fermentation.
ahh ok that makes sense. catabolite repression and all that


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