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Old 04-24-2013, 01:23 AM   #1
JSager89
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Default Lager: Crash Cool vs. Gentle cooling

So I am doing my second lager attempt, a maibock. I started with an OG of 1.070 and am hoping to hit a TG of 1.012-1.010. When I racked it the gravity showed 1.015, so I'm really close. It's finally done with primary and I just racked to a glass carboy at room temp for a diacatyl rest.

My question is what are the benefits of a gentle slope compared to just crash cooling? I have heard that if you don't do a rest, the slope allows the yeast time to continue processing their byproducts, but if you do a thorough rest and are force carbing (I am) that you can just crash cool and let it condition, as the yeast are sort of done with the job.

Any info would be great. Thanks!


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Old 04-24-2013, 01:34 AM   #2
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If your done with the yeast crash them out. I've not found any draw backs doing it. The slowly cooling it down method is the old way that it was done. The beer carbonated as it lagered so it had to be cooled down slowly before it was at FG. The modern way is to use a temp ramp or diacatyl rest for faster maturation.


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Old 04-24-2013, 04:37 AM   #3
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Great, this definitely helps with the space. I usually use my kreezer as a lager chamber, but it already has a pale ale force carbing in a serving keg.............don't really want to have to wait while I'm getting the temp back down
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Old 04-24-2013, 04:42 AM   #4
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Ferment, d-rest and crash away!
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Old 04-25-2013, 08:12 PM   #5
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One of the guys on the Brewing Network, maybe John Palmer or Jamil, suggested doing it when it is around 75% fermented. So 1.070 beer with TG of 1.010 = 60 points * 75% = 45, so 70-45 = around 1.025 gravity to do it at. A few days at the warmer temps will clean the diacetyl and help the beer fully ferment. I do not recall the reasons why they recommend that, but did try for my last lager and it came out great.
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Old 04-27-2013, 01:31 AM   #6
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I have heard similar. And I may or may not have given in and tasted the maibock right before the crash...............and if I had I'm fairly sure that the rest cleaned up the diacatyl beautifully........I would know that only if I had done this of course....
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:16 PM   #7
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Rise! Rise back to life!

As mentioned briefly here, there is some feeling that crash cooling can be hard on the yeast, even to the point of convincing them to start excreting substances that may not taste good (this is different from autolysis). For this reason, the logic goes, the crashing should be more of a ramp down.

Anyone actually have this "bad" experience with (unsought after) flavor effects of crash cooled yeast?
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Old 09-07-2013, 01:48 AM   #8
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The key is to not crash cool until the yeast are "done."
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Old 09-07-2013, 06:03 AM   #9
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I haven't lagered yet but I'm getting to it this winter. Anyways, when I have the time to crash my ales, I usually will do a 10F per day ramp down, only changing the temp once per day. Perhaps this will help someone...
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Old 09-12-2013, 06:21 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malticulous View Post
The key is to not crash cool until the yeast are "done."
That makes sense but I think the off flavors that practitioners of the no-crash method (ramp down) worry about come from yeast, either in suspension or that have floc'd out, regardless of whether or not their work is done. That is, they could just be chillin (he he) after hitting TG and then bam! someone throws them into cold crash at which point they get freaked out and excrete off flavors as they go into hibernation. But maybe the metabolic changes that occur when TG is hit limits excretion of off-flavors?

In any case, would be interesting to hear if a cold crash has led to off-flavors for anyone? Otherwise maybe a split-batch experiment is in order. But I suppose this only matter for impatient people--when in doubt, just ramp it down.


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