Specific proteases for reduction of chill haze - Home Brew Forums
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Old 04-22-2013, 03:54 PM   #1
SynthesisError
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Feb 2013
Oxford, MS
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In the interest of science, I'm trying to gather some info on the use of various protease enzymes to clarify beer. Has anyone used a serine protease like papain conjugates or Amino-Quik? Or a proline endoprotease like Clarity-Ferm?

I've been reading through old threads and other websites and have found very little information where homebrewers have actually used any of the above and given relevant results.

Qualitatively, I'd like to know:
-Did you add to the mash, or pitch with yeast?
-Was the body or head retention negatively impacted?
-Did you notice any negative effects on the fermentation (i.e, longer lag phase than usual or higher finishing gravity than expected?)
-Was the finished beer's clarity satisfactory?

I'm probably going to perform a controlled experiment comparing the efficacy and drawbacks of non-malt proteases in the foreseeable future, but before I go and blow my ramen noodle funds for the next two months, I'd like to get some opinions first.



 
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Old 04-22-2013, 07:22 PM   #2
PistolsAtDawn
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Apr 2011
Charleston, SC
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I can't directly answer your questions (or indirectly for that matter), but I can think of a specific member here who may know or want to try: Kai Troester (www.braukaiser.com)



 
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Old 04-24-2013, 12:14 AM   #3
boomernintysix
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Nov 2009
CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SynthesisError View Post
In the interest of science, I'm trying to gather some info on the use of various protease enzymes to clarify beer. Has anyone used a serine protease like papain conjugates or Amino-Quik? Or a proline endoprotease like Clarity-Ferm?
Chill haze is produced by phenol dimer/protein H-bonding, which increases with the lowering of temperature (hence 'chill haze'). If your experiencing chill haze without freezing your beer it means the pH in the mash is too high or the protein content is too low.

Next question is if you are experiencing chill haze. If you are it should fade as the beer warms up, if it doesn't you have another issue.

I'm not too familiar with a lot of the enzymes but papain KILLS head retention and should really not be used.

There's also no need to you to waste money if your solely interested in the exogenous enzymes effects. Anything on the market today has been put though its paces and there are many studies on its effects in beer. Your time and money would be better spent making more beer and refining your process.

Hope this helped, if you have any more questions I'll try to answer them to the best of my ability.

 
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Old 05-01-2013, 05:04 PM   #4
cosmo
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Nov 2010
Montverde, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boomernintysix View Post
Chill haze is produced by phenol dimer/protein H-bonding, which increases with the lowering of temperature (hence 'chill haze'). If your experiencing chill haze without freezing your beer it means the pH in the mash is too high or the protein content is too low.
What could cause the protein content to be too low? I ask because I get chill haze with a fairly low pH mash (5.2 measured with calibrated meter). Not sure if this is the same issue OP is having. Would a protien rest help?

 
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