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Old 04-21-2013, 08:26 PM   #1
Malty_Dog
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Fermenting Raison D'Saison (Jamil recipe), pitched last pm @68 using WLP566 Saison II yeast. Apparently a much less temperamental yeast than 556 or 3724. Its bubbling away vigorously now. I have the fermenter sitting in a large plastic tub and have an aquarium heater. Also plan to add cane sugar when signs of fermentation slow. Does anyone have a schedule of ramping temp that might be ideal? I was thinking of giving it 24-48 hrs @68, then moving up 2 degrees or so per day. Does this sound reasonable? TIA!


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Old 04-22-2013, 12:57 AM   #2
tgmartin000
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I've heard people have had success with this schedule, I plan on using it for my next saison.



 
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Old 04-22-2013, 01:10 AM   #3
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I used T-58 and just let it do it's thing. I read that it is OK to ferment this style warm. It got to 76-78 and turned out very good. It was my first and only Saison so I have nothing to compare to as far as if it was within style guidelines, though.

 
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Old 04-22-2013, 02:24 AM   #4
Malty_Dog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tgmartin000 View Post
I've heard people have had success with this schedule, I plan on using it for my next saison.
Cool. I'll follow up and report on how this goes. I'd like to hit at least 80. Will be adding sugar when airlock activity slows significantly.
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Old 04-22-2013, 02:27 AM   #5
thasnazzle
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I've had success with both 3711 and 3724 doing a day at 68 and then letting temp rise naturally. My ambient temps during the day are 80-85.
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Old 04-22-2013, 03:21 PM   #6
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24-48 at 65 and then let it rise about 2 degrees per day is how I have been doing it. I don't think you need to get much higher than low 80's. I've been adding the sugar component just like you're planing, when the fermentation slow, and I have not had the stuck fermentation issues that a lot of people do even with the 3724.

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Old 04-22-2013, 03:24 PM   #7
Malty_Dog
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Nice, ghack thanks for the feedback. I wasn't adventurous enough to try 3724 (first saison ever). Looking forward to adding sugar in next day or so and beginning temp ramp-up.
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:04 PM   #8
TopherM
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Yeah, it's not like a normal stuck fermentation. Once the fermentation pretty much stops at 68, it's going to be super easy to get it started again by ramping up into the 80s. Due to the thermal mass, you don't have to be super careful with ramping up the temp, either. The idea is just not to change the temp uber rapidly, like in a matter of hours.

I usually ferment on temp control for about a week (low 60s), then pull it out and put it at room temp for a couple days (mid 70s), then toss it in a bathroom (with no AC vents) with a space heater in the mid 80s until FG (about 2-3 more days).

Saison yeast is VERY forgiving, because you are trying to get those saison esters, so you don't really have to worry too much about the particulars of the fermentation compared to other yeasts. Just follow the basic idea, and the beer's going to be just fine.

That'll do 'er. Good luck.
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Old 04-22-2013, 07:17 PM   #9
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Thanks TopherM, that's reassuring stuff.
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Old 04-22-2013, 07:43 PM   #10
murrahjm
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Last summer I did a couple of saisons, pitched in the mid 60's then stuck it out in the garage. Summer in Texas meaning 90 in the shade. Had it wrapped in a towel to try to smooth out the temp swings a bit. Not sure what it got up to since my stick on thermometer doesn't go high enough, but it bubbled away consistently for about 3 weeks before it was done. This was with the infamous 3724, they came out delicious. So I'd say you can't get it too hot.



 
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