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Old 04-17-2013, 07:02 AM   #1
danebramaged
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Default Russian imperial stout yeast questions.

I have 4 gallons of 1.090 og stout that has been fermenting for 9 days. Gravity is now at 1.022. No activity in air lock. Is that about as low as I can get? Pitched big starter of whitbread 1099. Here's a pic if you can tell of this beer app on my phone of the grain bill. It seems about right on final og. But beer seems super sweet. Should I rack, bottle, pitch more yeast? Also how long should I age? In bottle or secondary?
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Old 04-17-2013, 07:21 AM   #2
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I had to reread your post a couple of time to make sure I was seeing the right thing. You say you got 4 gallons but your boil and target say 10 and 8,also I dont see the hops...

If I can assume that you modified the recipe and that you have some appropriate balance of hops and I just go off your posted hydrometer readings, I can say that you had a very strong and fast ferment, and appear to have really got down to where most would be very satisfied in terms of FG. However, if I were you, I would leave on the cake for a couple more weeks, and then bottle, then sit back and wait a couple of months. That sweetness you describe sounds right to me in a RIS. Some of the flavors are not likely matured, so more time in the bottle will likely improve the balance. Just being flat is a hard way to tell how a beer will turn out, with CO2 adding a bite of sorts.
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Old 04-17-2013, 07:22 AM   #3
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I'd give it another week or two in primary then transfer to secondary and give it some time there before bottling. Then let it bottle condition for a good while as well. That's a big beer and it can use some time to itself before you start drinking it. I'm talking about not thinking about it until late Summer or Fall maybe. No matter what you do, I pretty much promise you that the last one you open will be the best and you'll wish you waited longer.

I've found that bulk aging for a while before bottling helps speed the conditioning process along nicely though.
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:05 AM   #4
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Ho ho ho! Nine days in the fermenter with an OG of 1.090 and you wonder if it is done already? Leave that beer alone, it is far from ready to bottle. Try it again in a month and see what the gravity is. This is a big dark beer and it takes time for the yeast to chew through all the sugars and more time yet to clean up the intermediate products. Then because it is a dark beer it will take time to mature too. I wouldn't be afraid to let this beer have 2 months in the primary fermenter and another 2 to 4 months in the bottles before drinking it.
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Old 04-17-2013, 01:12 PM   #5
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Unless I'm missing something, a full third of the grain bill consists of unfermentables, so going from 90 points down to 22 - especially with that yeast strain - is probably the lowest it's going to get...

Cheers!
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Old 04-17-2013, 01:17 PM   #6
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Agree, there are a lot of unfermentables in there, so 1.020 would be the lowest I'd expect. I'd give it 2 more weeks in primary, then a few months in secondary. Then bottle and forget about it till Thanksgiving. Those first couple will be a little rough. But the ones you have by next spring will be fantastic.
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:36 PM   #7
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Thanks for all the tips. I didn't put my hop additions in that recipe because I split the batch. 4 gallons of 1.090 and 6 of of 1.050. My second attempt at trying a parti gyle mash. Like the idea of getting two beers out of one mash.
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:52 PM   #8
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Ya I'm thinking this will be perfect this fall.
On another topic I bottled a triple about two months ago. I tested one for the first time and it was great but no carbination. Should I wait and see if the others carb and how long?
To carb I just added normal amount of priming sugar. Forgot to get OG but I estimate it was around 1.100 and beer finished at 1.012. Should I have added some new yeast at bottling because of the high alcohol?
Thanks.
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:39 PM   #9
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High Gravity beer can be notorious for taking their time. Belgium strains can be notorious for deciding to take a nap, stop fermenting or start back up again provided thee are fermentables present of course). Adding a neutral bottling strain might help, it is what a large number of Belgium beer producers do, IIRC.
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