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Old 10-04-2007, 05:47 AM   #1
BlendieOfIndie
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Default Cause of smokey flavor?

Hey everyone - here's what's up:

I transfered to secondary fermentation about 3 days ago, and I sampled the beer from the hydrometer beaker. It had a distinctive smokey character - not just a hint of smoke, but fairly blatant. I'm know that the favor is only 1/2 developed so far - still needs the aging. But I was wondering what might cause the smokey flavor? Is it carmalized sugar that ... carmalized during the boil? Is it "large" sugars / fusel alcohols/ other chemicals that the yeast will digest during 2nd fermentation?

Brown Ale
Heres the ingredients (from a minimash):
1.75 lb 2-Row
1 lb Munich
8 oz Caravienne
8 oz Aromatic
8 oz Carapils
8 oz Crystal 60L
4 oz Chocolate
--
1oz Northern Brewer Hops (6.8) - bittering
1&1 oz Kent Goldings - flavor & aroma
--
English Ale Yeast

Thanks


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Old 10-04-2007, 01:11 PM   #2
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You have several 'biscuit' types there. Maybe combined, they are producing the smell.


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Old 10-04-2007, 01:37 PM   #3
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I'd agree with David. Also, some yeasts can actually give off some by-products that are "smoky" in nature, so that could be contributing as well.
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Old 10-04-2007, 01:51 PM   #4
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How did you ferment, and what was your yeast? As Baron mentioned, yeasts can give off "smoky" phenols.


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Old 10-04-2007, 09:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexLaw
How did you ferment, and what was your yeast? As Baron mentioned, yeasts can give off "smoky" phenols.


TL

Ferment -
7.5 Gal plastic bucket.
6 days
67-72 degrees
top fermenting, english ale yeast from "White Labs" (don't know the strain off top of my head).

2nd fermentation -
5 gal glass carboy
Planning for 2 weeks
65-70 degrees (weather got cooler )


Initial gravity: 1.065
Gravity after primary fermentation: 1.025


Is this the type of flavor that mellows with age?
I'll try to remember to update this post with the final result in a few weeks.

-David
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Old 10-04-2007, 10:01 PM   #6
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Having made a barleywine with too much peat smoked malt, I can verify that (at least that type of smoke) mellows with age.
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Old 10-04-2007, 10:57 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
You have several 'biscuit' types there. Maybe combined, they are producing the smell.
Which grains qualify as 'biscuit' types? What does that mean?
Thanks.
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:53 PM   #8
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The class of malts is really Kilned malts, but one of the common elements is a toasted biscuit flavor. Biscuit, Victory, Munich, Vienna and Carapils fall into this group.
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Old 11-19-2007, 06:32 AM   #9
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The beer has finished, and I have tasted several "samples."
I don't taste any smoke flavor at all. The beer's flavor is a bit more potent than I would like, but I'm attributing this to high fermentation temperatures (prolly in the 80s since room temp was 70s).

It is also worth noting that my oatmeal stout had a similar smoky flavor between primary & secondary fermentation. The stout is currently in bottles (awaiting bubbles), but again, the smoky flavor disappeared after secondary fermentation.

Just more confirmation for beginners: RDWHAHB
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Old 11-19-2007, 04:49 PM   #10
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That sounds like phenols to me. With the high fermentation temperature, the yeast was more likely to make phenols. Then, in time, they faded.


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