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Old 04-07-2013, 12:49 AM   #1
huskeypm
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Jan 2012
Del Mar, CA
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Hi all,
I'm trying to decide whether my beer is done fermenting or if I need to pitch yeast more yeast. The beer is an oatmeal porter partial mash, had a ~1.06 OG, and used yeast starter from a previous batch. After two weeks the FG was only 1.03, I warmed it for a week to 73 degrees, still no change, added yeast energizer, and after 4 weeks, it's still holding steady at 1.03. Nevertheless, the beer is very dry for having such a high FG, which makes me think that my mashing went awry and yielded a low amount of fermentables, which are now exhausted.

Some additional details are that I mashed at about 152 F, but it turned out that not all of the grain was submerged somehow. The temperature probably dove to the mid 140s after 70 minutes or so. I sparged near 170 and got what I thought was about 1.04 OG. I also forgot to add some of the specialty grains to the mash (choco malt), so instead added them to the boil, along with some extract to bring OG up to 1.06.

Any thoughts on my next course of action (pitch or bottle?)

Thanks!!
pete

 
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Old 04-07-2013, 01:10 AM   #2
duboman
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Is this reading with a hydrometer or refractometer?

I ask because you said the beer tastes dry but at 1.030 it certainly shouldn't taste dry, it should taste overly sweet

If you used a refractometer take a reading with an hydrometer. Refractometers do not read well when there is alcohol present and even with proper conversion the reading may not be correct.
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Old 04-07-2013, 01:43 AM   #3
huskeypm
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Thanks for your response. The reading was taken with hydrometer.

 
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Old 04-07-2013, 01:48 AM   #4
chumpsteak
 
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If you added grains to the boil that may be where the "dryness" is coming from in the form of astringency. Tannins are released from barley husks at higher temps and pH levels. 1.030 should not yield a "dry" beer. You are most likely tasting astringency. Or maybe your hydrometer is not reading correctly.
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Old 04-07-2013, 01:48 AM   #5
pabloj13
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Have you checked your hydrometer in 60 degree water to see if it reads 1.000?
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Old 04-07-2013, 02:11 AM   #6
huskeypm
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Jan 2012
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Hmm, I worried about the astringency but I had hoped the pound or two of specialty grains wouldn't be noticeable.
I check the hydrometer recently at 70 degrees and it was off by 0.002, so unfortunately it doesn't explain the 0.015 difference between my FG and expected OG (1.03 vs 1.015 or so)

So it sounds like my 'unfermentables' theory is probably not correct? Does that leave re-pitching?
p

 
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Old 04-07-2013, 02:22 AM   #7
duboman
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Yes, boiling the grains extracted tannins which would create astringency which is a dry, puckering taste but that still doesn't explain the high gravity

Are you temp correcting your reading? Perhaps at this point the grain bill would help

Also, what yeast and did you make a starter ? If dry was it an 11g pack?
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Old 04-07-2013, 02:24 AM   #8
pabloj13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duboman View Post
Yes, boiling the grains extracted tannins which would create astringency which is a dry, puckering taste but that still doesn't explain the high gravity

Are you temp correcting your reading? Perhaps at this point the grain bill would help
I agree. Even with tannins, a taste of that gravity would go "hmmm that's sweet...<pucker from tannins>." Something's not right.
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Old 04-07-2013, 06:27 AM   #9
huskeypm
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Jan 2012
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Thank you for you responses.
-The grain bill follows the end of the email.
-I didn't report a temperature-corrected hydrometer reading, but apparently the difference between ambient and the 60F reference is 0.001, so not much at all.
-I did make a ~2 L starter at 1.06 OG and I don't recall the original yeast type (was from a packet). I have recycled the yeast maybe three times so far and the prior batches stopped early (1.02) but were still ok to bottle.

I'll check again tomorrow for the sweet-to-pucker test, as I just ate a couple of cookies.

Pete


Bills:


8.0 oz Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM) Grain 7 3.3 %
1 lbs Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L (40.0 SRM) Grain 3 6.7 %
1 lbs Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM) Grain 4 6.7 %
8.0 oz Black (Patent) Malt (500.0 SRM) Grain 6 3.3 %
3 lbs Munich Malt (9.0 SRM) Grain 2 20.0 %
1 lbs Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) Grain 5 6.7 %
8 lbs Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 1 53.3 %
---> replace with 3 lbs malt + 3 lbs 10 oz LME

All were mashed at 156 (and eventually down to mid 140s) according to the recipe at the bottom of (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/help...-clone-169726/)
The exception of course were 2lbs of the specialty grains, which I now wonder if I ever filtered out (grain bag was kaputt)

 
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Old 04-07-2013, 12:28 PM   #10
duboman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huskeypm
Thank you for you responses.
-The grain bill follows the end of the email.
-I didn't report a temperature-corrected hydrometer reading, but apparently the difference between ambient and the 60F reference is 0.001, so not much at all.
-I did make a ~2 L starter at 1.06 OG and I don't recall the original yeast type (was from a packet). I have recycled the yeast maybe three times so far and the prior batches stopped early (1.02) but were still ok to bottle.

I'll check again tomorrow for the sweet-to-pucker test, as I just ate a couple of cookies.

Pete

Bills:

8.0 oz Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM) Grain 7 3.3 %
1 lbs Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L (40.0 SRM) Grain 3 6.7 %
1 lbs Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM) Grain 4 6.7 %
8.0 oz Black (Patent) Malt (500.0 SRM) Grain 6 3.3 %
3 lbs Munich Malt (9.0 SRM) Grain 2 20.0 %
1 lbs Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) Grain 5 6.7 %
8 lbs Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 1 53.3 %
---> replace with 3 lbs malt + 3 lbs 10 oz LME

All were mashed at 156 (and eventually down to mid 140s) according to the recipe at the bottom of (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/help...-clone-169726/)
The exception of course were 2lbs of the specialty grains, which I now wonder if I ever filtered out (grain bag was kaputt)
20% of the grain bill is crystal/specialty grain which is a lot of less fermentable grain and you mashed high and used tired yeast-your starter should have been a lower gravity, like 1.040.

IMO this is the reason why the beer stalled out on you
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