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Old 04-03-2013, 12:37 AM   #1
cageybee
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Jan 2013
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so, this beer is pretty dark and murky and the bottle the lhbs owner gave me was great....but murky...almost chewy (exaggerating a bit). the bottom line is that clarity was not a concern/advantage. so....what would be the point of waiting beyond the point of a stable post-fermenting specific gravity to bottling?

thnx

p.s. to have a lhbs that gives bottle samples is freeking AWESOME

 
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:42 AM   #2
BlackGoat
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Pro: Bottles don't explode
Con: Nothing

If you bottle before fermentation is complete, there could be additional fermentation in the bottle (beyond just the consumption of the priming sugar) and you could end up with overcarbonated beer. You must always make sure that fermentation is complete, which is indicated by the gravity stablizing, no matter the beer style. Not sure what the first part regarding the belgian stout has to do with the question though. In any case, free homebrew is awesome!
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:43 AM   #3
cageybee
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the point I was trying to make is that it's dark brown and pretty opaque anyway....so I don't care about achieving clarity.

 
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:44 AM   #4
BlackGoat
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and on a second read of your post, I'm wondering if what you are getting is "why would someone batch-age a beer prior to bottling"? If that is the question, the answer is that you often do that to let flavors mellow out, and sometimes to allow certain additives to remain in contact with your beer... things like oak cubes.
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:46 AM   #5
lowtones84
 
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The advantage of waiting after you reach your FG with a beer like that is more about cleaning up fermentation by-products. Most people would say 2-3 days after you reach your FG is good enough, and I usually go about 3 days after FG personally if it's not a high gravity brew.

The other advantage is that more yeast will drop out, though if you "cold crash" for just a night you can accomplish the same thing. While it's not a huge concern, I think it's nice to end up with a little less sediment in the bottles.

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Old 04-03-2013, 12:51 AM   #6
bleme
 
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I think the OP is asking if there are any advantages to bulk conditioning vs bottle conditioning.

All I have noticed is that the "green" seems to go away a little faster sitting on the yeast than it does in the bottle. I also get less yeast sediment in my bottle, but the bottles take a little longer to carb fully.

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Old 04-03-2013, 01:21 AM   #7
ShinyBuddha
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lowtones84 View Post
The advantage of waiting after you reach your FG with a beer like that is more about cleaning up fermentation by-products. Most people would say 2-3 days after you reach your FG is good enough, and I usually go about 3 days after FG personally if it's not a high gravity brew.

The other advantage is that more yeast will drop out, though if you "cold crash" for just a night you can accomplish the same thing. While it's not a huge concern, I think it's nice to end up with a little less sediment in the bottles.
This +1. Also, giving the beer time to age typically applies to high gravity profiles. This is usually done in either a keg, barrel, or secondary fermenter off the primary yeast cake. It can further age in the bottle after that point. I believe there are some great threads on this topic in the forum.

 
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