Why not FWH on every APA and IPA - Home Brew Forums
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Old 04-02-2013, 10:42 PM   #1
greatschmaltez
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I've read a lot on this technique and am trying to come up with a scenario that I would not want to eliminate a 60 (or 90) minute hop bitterness addition and instead get my bittering IBUs from FWH additions. Everything I've read, this type of addition give more flavor and aroma (along with the appropriate bitterness) than bittering additions at the beginning of the boil. Any good counter points?



 
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Old 04-02-2013, 10:48 PM   #2
ILoveBeer2
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I FWH everything and have not found a reason not to.



 
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Old 04-02-2013, 11:17 PM   #3
mooshimanx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatschmaltez View Post
I've read a lot on this technique and am trying to come up with a scenario that I would not want to eliminate a 60 (or 90) minute hop bitterness addition and instead get my bittering IBUs from FWH additions. Everything I've read, this type of addition give more flavor and aroma (along with the appropriate bitterness) than bittering additions at the beginning of the boil. Any good counter points?
Sometimes I actually want a more biting bitterness addition. You also usually will have to hop burst to get to the bitterness level you want in an IPA (very large FWH additions start to become astringent) which can use a ton of hops and not necessarily increase the perceived hoppiness multiplicatively by the amount of hops you actually used.

 
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Old 04-02-2013, 11:30 PM   #4
UnDeadPresident
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From what I hear it eliminates the more harsh tones of the bitterness, so if that's a component of a good I/APA for you, then you may want to avoid the method. If you like your bitterness to be more smooth, FWH may be the way to go.
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Old 04-02-2013, 11:59 PM   #5
bmick
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I like to use a high-alpha hop that's know for it's smooth bitterness (Warrior/Galena/Super Galena) as a FWH for the bittering backbone in all my IPAs. Other than that everything is added from 15 mins on. Works great and all the beers done this way have done very well in comps.

 
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Old 04-03-2013, 01:43 AM   #6
MidTNJasonF
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I FWH every APA or IPA I make and have been doing so for a couple of years now. Heck I have even first wort hopped a couple stouts and porters.
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Old 04-03-2013, 02:27 AM   #7
greatschmaltez
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Cool, the general consensus of this thread is kind of where I was at for these two styles. Other styles where hop flavor/aroma isn't as desirable, I can see going regular bitterness additions, but ipa/apa, this seems the way to go with the precautions mentioned.

Galena is my preferred FWH as well.

 
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Old 04-03-2013, 02:40 AM   #8
billl
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Well, the obvious counterpoint is that pretty much every commercial IPA you probably love does not FWH. That doesn't mean it isn't a valid technique, but obviously people are making top notch IPA using standard bittering additions.

 
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Old 04-03-2013, 03:18 AM   #9
Krovitz
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I heard Stone FWH a number of their beers.

 
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Old 04-03-2013, 03:19 AM   #10
theveganbrewer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billl View Post
Well, the obvious counterpoint is that pretty much every commercial IPA you probably love does not FWH. That doesn't mean it isn't a valid technique, but obviously people are making top notch IPA using standard bittering additions.
There are quite a lot of commercial breweries making top beers in their styles using FWH.


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