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Old 04-02-2013, 03:50 AM   #11
xtian116
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billpaustin
Since it always gets cool here in the mountains, I try to time it so that the yeast gets going in the night, when it cools down. Room temp is low 60's in the morning, but brew temp is usually around 65-66. Even then, the yeast is trying to go crazy (Nottingham especially).

I'd hate to see 84, better get a blowoff tube or something
You're lucky. I wish it was in the low 60's here all the time. It's 90 one day, then 68 the next. It's almost summer, that's the easiest time. It's always 100-120ish. A/C running full speed, that's when I always get the best results.


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Old 04-02-2013, 09:22 AM   #12
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Update:

Checked last night before bed (28ish hours after yeast addition). Having kept the house at 62 all day (I didn't raise the temp when I got home like I normally do), the thermo strip was reading 70*, so it climbed two degrees since I turned the fan off of it. The blowoff was bubbling roughly 2 times per second unevenly. (Yep, am aware that bubbling is not necessarily an indication of anything).

Beer appearance is a light to middle yellow and extremely cloudy (I would call it "Squash" colored).

When I went to bed, I uncovered the carboy (being dark) and turned the overhead fan on high.

Woke up this morning, roughly 36ish hours after adding yeast, to find it still bubbling at about the same rate... maybe a little slower. Temperature is now reading 64/66* (both are lit up on the strip). Going to leave the house cold again today and possibly tomorrow before going back to my routine of raising the house temperature when I am home.

Color and appearance have not changed (didn't expect it to, but since I had to look at the thermometer, figured I would make note of the color/apparent texture while I was at it.

The exhaust smell from the blowoff bottle is now about 15-20% rhino fart with 80-85% sweet beer smell.

Plans for a long, restful fermentation/secondary/bottling have not changed.



What does the group suggest as the best way to try and clear up the unpleasantness (if any even exists). I realize that I am making plans early... not really PLANS... more contingencies
-Long time in primary
-Long time in secondary
-Long time in bottling
-Any combination of the three... or a rejection of all three?




*any repetative notations that may look like "Worry Warting" are probably simply "Engineer's Ambition", a strange and wonderful addiction to trying to be as precise and accurate as possible, sometimes to the point of annoying people or looking like "nervous Nellys".


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Old 04-02-2013, 04:11 PM   #13
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Personally, I'd go with about 3weeks in the primary, and if it smelled funny on transfer, try dry hopping it a little in the secondary. Or just let it sit in the bottles and try one every once in a while to see how age treats it.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:23 PM   #14
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I'd go 3 in primary as well. I'm worried you are going to have fusel alcohols (headache maker), but there is nothing to be done about that now. Cream ales are delicious, but there is not much to cover any off flavors. My fingers are crossed. BTW, my first batch was an Amber with Notty and I had similar issues with early temps (a few degrees cooler). It had a definite twang early on, but actually aged out pretty decent after 8-12 weeks in the bottle.

My rule of thumb is to always warm the yeast until fermentation is complete, but to start out on the very low end. So the liquid yeast sits in the fridge at ~ 40F. Cool the wort as low as I can, usually 60F for most ales. Pitch the yeast. Put it somewhere to warm up a couple of degrees to start fermentation. Hold temps for the exothermic part of the fermentation (usually first 48-60 hrs). Then let it rise as fermentation continues.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:35 PM   #15
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This happened to me with my last batch. I brewed the WH Honey porter with Nottingham yeast. On day two of fermentation the weather surprisingly got hot and my fermenting temps went to 85 degrees for two days. I was stuck at work for those two days and my wife informed me of the high temps. I was pissed off and was worried that I ruined the whole batch, after doing much research on this forum and other forums.

I ended up leaving it in primary for two weeks, then transfered to secondary. During the transfer the beer smelled like rotten eggs and the beer had a slight green taste. I left it for one more week in secondary then tasted it again.

The second taste was amazing. So much change from the original flavor. I was amazed how Nottingham yeast was able to "clean up" after a very warm primary fermentation. My neighbor came over and tasted the brew, he thought it was absolutely delicious for an uncarbonated beer. Given the positive results I decided to bottle. The aging will continue for at least three weeks in the bottle, I can't wait to try the first one.

Moral of the story....have faith in today's yeast. The yeast is much better these days than say 10 years ago. Also don't be afraid to ask questions and do research, however don't let the answers you find discourage you. The first few days of fermentation is no doubt the most important and temps need to be under control. Although time is key to a lot of mistakes and patience is strongly encouraged.

I mostly keg my beer but because of this mistake I needed to age it while longer, so bottling is the solution I came up with. I ended up brewing another batch and making sure I didn't screw that one up so I can keg and enjoy in a few weeks vs. months.

I think your batch will be fine because you took immediate action. I on the other hand couldn't take immediate action and I still made a great beer that even my neighbors will enjoy.
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:26 AM   #16
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Update this morning... about 62 hours after pitching yeast.

Material still cloudy and a light yellow.

Temperature is 63/64*, which is about 3* above ambient where the carboy is located.

Still bubbling, though activity has slowed to roughly 1/second.

Exhaust smell is becoming still sweeter and the musty smell is disappearing.


Meanwhile, my amber ale (1st Ale-mendment) is conditioning nicely in secondary and unless I run out of other stocks (unlikely) will continue to age right next to my cream ale.


Does anyone know if there is like a Slickdeals.net for homebrew? (if you don't know what Slickdeals is.... prepare your wallet to be assailed daily).
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Old 04-07-2013, 12:40 PM   #17
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Alright,

Almost one week after brew and it is starting to clear ever so slightly.

The exhaust smell is my normal beer sweet, but we are still getting one bubble every 2-3 seconds.... *confused* This is abnormal for me. Normally by this point I get a bubble every few minutes. Oh well, let it do its thing I guess.

Going to leave it in primary for 2 more weeks, and then make a decision whether or not to stuff her in the closet (colder in there) for a secondary to try and clear up a bit (both color and nasty byproducts).
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Old 04-07-2013, 02:07 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DasBaldDog View Post
Alright,

Almost one week after brew and it is starting to clear ever so slightly.

The exhaust smell is my normal beer sweet, but we are still getting one bubble every 2-3 seconds.... *confused* This is abnormal for me. Normally by this point I get a bubble every few minutes. Oh well, let it do its thing I guess.

Going to leave it in primary for 2 more weeks, and then make a decision whether or not to stuff her in the closet (colder in there) for a secondary to try and clear up a bit (both color and nasty byproducts).
I've read that warmer temps after the initial phase of fermentation is actually a good thing because it keeps the yeast in suspension to "clean up". Also if you are only doing 3 weeks before bottling/kegging then I would just leave it in primary the whole time rather than racking to a secondary.
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Old 04-07-2013, 02:35 PM   #19
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I brewed a batch that I allowed to lurk in the high 70's and low 80's. The yeast was S-04 which shouldn't ever go above 70 degrees. The esters where definitely noticable. However, a long conditioning of about 3 months improved it considerably and it ended up being a decent beer. None-the-less, I avoid high temps now. The point is that the beer will be most likely be good and there isn't any reason to believe it is ruined.
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:36 PM   #20
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Okay.

Probably final update.


The beer was bottled about 3 weeks ago after cold crashing for 3 days at 35*.


It is crisp, clear and delicious. It has a slight sweetness to it, but no banana or other noticeable fruit flavors.

All in all, another homebrew that screwed up and turned out great.


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